Get the best of Chabad.org content every week!
Find answers to fascinating Jewish questions, enjoy holiday tips and guides, read real-life stories and more!
ב"ה
To view Shabbat Times click here to set your location

Wednesday, 4 Nissan, 5781

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
To view Halachic Times click here to set your location
Jewish History

On the morning of the 4th of Nissan, a civilian convoy of doctors and nurses traveling to the Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus (see Today in Jewish History for 20 Iyar) was attacked by Arab forces. Of the ten vehicles in the caravan, five escaped. The other five vehicles, however, which included two buses and an ambulance, were riddled with machine gun fire and later set ablaze. Altogether 77 Jewish civilians were massacred on that day.

Shortly afterwards, the hospital was closed down and moved to the western part of Jerusalem.

The Mt. Scopus hospital only reopened after the eastern part of Jerusalem was liberated by Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War. Primarily staffed by Israeli doctors, it is the largest and best equipped hospital in the eastern section of Jerusalem.

Laws and Customs

In today's "Nasi" reading (see "Nasi of the Day" in Nissan 1), we read of the gift bought by the nasi of the tribe of Reuben, Elitzur ben Shedeur, for the inauguration of the Mishkan.

Text of today's Nasi in Hebrew and English.

Daily Thought

If we are still slaves—to social approval, to the validation of others, to our appetites, to our addictions, to our egos—how can we celebrate the Exodus from Egypt? How can we celebrate a liberation that has yet to be complete?

Because with the Exodus, the notion of freedom entered our blood and our souls. It changed us to our very core.

We came to know what it is. To desire it. And we became capable of achieving it—on our own. We became innately free.

So that at the Passover Seder this year, we can become actually free.