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Skokie, IL 60076 | change

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Calendar for: Lubavitch Chabad of Skokie 4059 Dempster Street, Skokie, IL 60076   |   Contact Info
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Yud-Tes Kislev - "Rosh Hashanah of Chassidism"
Halachic Times (Zmanim)
Times for Skokie, IL 60076
5:31 AM
Dawn (Alot Hashachar):
6:10 AM
Earliest Tallit and Tefillin (Misheyakir):
7:06 AM
Sunrise (Hanetz Hachamah):
9:21 AM
Latest Shema:
10:08 AM
Latest Shacharit:
11:42 AM
Midday (Chatzot Hayom):
12:06 PM
Earliest Mincha (Mincha Gedolah):
2:27 PM
Mincha Ketanah (“Small Mincha”):
3:26 PM
Plag Hamincha (“Half of Mincha”):
4:19 PM
Sunset (Shkiah):
4:51 PM
Nightfall (Tzeit Hakochavim):
11:42 PM
Midnight (Chatzot HaLailah):
46:54 min.
Shaah Zmanit (proportional hour):
Events for Lubavitch Chabad of Skokie
Click for more information about our Chanukah offerings
Where:
Lubavitch Chabad of Skokie
5:30am
Our Beis Medrash Boker 5:30 a.m. Torah study is growing in popularity like wildfire.
Where:
Lubavitch Chabad of Skokie
6:30am
Our daily morning service takes place at 6:30 am, and at 8 am on some fast days and public holidays
7:15am
Join Rabbi Yosef Posner in learning Gemara every weekday morning.
Where:
Lubavitch Chabad of Skokie
10:30am - 12:00pm
Debate and disputation are not only encouraged within Judaism but reside at the very heart of Jewish history and theology. In this six-lesson course, we explore six fundamental conflicts that pit the greatest Jewish minds against each other--six instances of vastly divergent perspectives from throughout our history, including several that remain questions for us today.
1:00pm
Where:
8:00pm - 9:30pm
Debate and disputation are not only encouraged within Judaism but reside at the very heart of Jewish history and theology. In this six-lesson course, we explore six fundamental conflicts that pit the greatest Jewish minds against each other--six instances of vastly divergent perspectives from throughout our history, including several that remain questions for us today.
Jewish History

Rabbi DovBer, known as "The Maggid of Mezeritch", was the disciple of, and successor to, the founder of Chassidism, Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov. Rabbi DovBer led the Chassidic movement from 1761 until his passing on Kislev 19, 1772.

Links:
The Maggid's Passing
About Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch

On the 19th of Kislev of the year 5559 from creation (1798), Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi -- a leading disciple of Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch (see previous entry) and the founder of Chabad Chassidism -- was released from his imprisonment in the Peter-Paul fortress in Petersburg, where he was held for 53 days on charges that his teachings threatened the imperial authority of the Czar. More than a personal liberation, this was a watershed event in the history of Chassidism heralding a new era in the revelation of the "inner soul" of Torah, and is celebrated to this day as "The Rosh Hashanah of Chassidism."

Links: About Kislev 19

On the very day that Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi was liberated from prison (see above), a granddaughter was born to him -- the daugher of his son Rabbi Dovber and his wife Rebbetzin Sheina. The girl was named Menuchah Rachel -- "Menuchah", meaning "tranquility" (Rachel was the name of a daughter of Rabbi Schneur Zalman who died in her youth).

In 1845, Rebbetzin Menuchah Rachel realized her lifelong desire to live in the Holy Land when she and her husband, Rabbi Yaakov Culi Slonim (d. 1857), led a contingent of Chassidim who settled in Hebron. Famed for her wisdom, piety and erudition, she served as the matriarch of the Chassidic community in Hebron until her passing in her 90th year in 1888.

Laws and Customs

Chassidim joyfully celebrate today and tomorrow as the Rosh Hashanah ("new year") of Chassidism (see "Today in Jewish History"), with farbrengens (Chassidic gatherings) and an increased commitment to the ways and teachings of Chassidism. Tachnun (supplication) and similar prayers are omitted. We begin anew the yearly cycle of the daily study of the Tanya, Rabbi Schneur Zalman's major Chassidic work (as part of the "Chitas" daily study program.)

Links: The Longer Shorter Way; Today's Tanya Lesson

In Chabad practice, Tachanun (confession of sins) and similar prayers are omitted today.
Daily Thought

Abraham worshipped idols as did his father, Terach. Abraham was an intelligent man, as was Terach. But Abraham came to recognize the falseness of the idols, while Terach stayed behind.

Because Terach never truly believed in the idols and never truly worshipped them. But when Abraham worshipped idols, it was with all his heart, mind and soul, every hour of the day and night. It had to be real.

Everything Abraham did had to be real. And therefore, he found truth.

Siddur Im Dach, Lulav.