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Thursday, 1 Cheshvan, 5782

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
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Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan
Jewish History

The Holy Temple, which took seven years to build, was completed by King Solomon during the month of MarCheshvan (I Kings 6:38), although not necessarily on this exact day. (Its dedication, however, was postponed until Tishrei of the following year—see calendar entry for 8 Tishrei). The First Temple served as the epicenter of Jewish national and spiritual life for 410 years, until its destruction by the Babylonians in 423 BCE.

Links:
The Holy Temple; The Holy Temple: An Anthology

Laws and Customs

Today is the second of the two Rosh Chodesh ("Head of the Month") days for the month of Cheshvan (when a month has 30 days, both the last day of the month and the first day of the following month serve as the following month's Rosh Chodesh).

Special portions are added to the daily prayers: Hallel (Psalms 113-118) is recited -- in its "partial" form -- following the Shacharit morning prayer, and the Yaaleh V'yavo prayer is added to the Amidah and to Grace After Meals; the additional Musaf prayer is said (when Rosh Chodesh is Shabbat, special additions are made to the Shabbat Musaf). Tachnun (confession of sins) and similar prayers are omitted.

Many have the custom to mark Rosh Chodesh with a festive meal and reduced work activity. The latter custom is prevalent amongst women, who have a special affinity with Rosh Chodesh -- the month being the feminine aspect of the Jewish Calendar.

Links: The 29th Day; The Lunar Files

The month of Cheshvan is also called "Mar-Cheshvan." Mar means "bitter" -- an allusion to the fact that the month contains no festive days. Mar also means "water", alluding to the month's special connection with rains (the 7th of Cheshvan is the day on which Jews begin praying for rain (in the Holy Land), and the Great Flood, which we read about in this week's Torah reading, began on Cheshvan 17th).

Links: The Last Jew

Daily Thought

It is a love more fierce than death…its coals burn with the fire of a divine flame. The mightiest oceans are incapable of extinguishing this love, and rivers cannot wash it away.
—Song of Songs 8:6–7.

Deep within the human soul burns an intense love, a yearning to reunite with the Infinite Light from which it emerged.

The flood of anxieties that fill this world are incapable of inundating that love. The rapid rivers of the busiest, noisiest life cannot wash it away.

Because it is not a flame lit by human hands, not a love born of human imagination. It is an innate love, divinely forged, a love that lies at the very essence. For all this world was only made to serve this love, to fall into the harmony of its spell.

Ride above the waves. Surround yourself with an ark of divine wisdom and precious deeds, and let the flood of waters carry you high.

That flame will burst into a brilliant fire. For all the challenges it has faced will have rendered it that much greater.

Mayim Rabim 5738