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Times displayed for
Issaquah, WA 98029 | change

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Calendar for: Chabad of the Central Cascades 24121 SE Black Nugget Road, Issaquah, WA 98029-7609   |   Contact Info
Halachic Times (Zmanim)
Times for Issaquah, WA 98029
5:41 AM
Dawn (Alot Hashachar):
6:22 AM
Earliest Tallit and Tefillin (Misheyakir):
7:19 AM
Sunrise (Hanetz Hachamah):
9:48 AM
Latest Shema:
10:39 AM
Latest Shacharit:
12:22 PM
Midday (Chatzot Hayom):
12:49 PM
Earliest Mincha (Mincha Gedolah):
3:23 PM
Mincha Ketanah (“Small Mincha”):
4:27 PM
Plag Hamincha (“Half of Mincha”):
5:27 PM
Sunset (Shkiah):
5:59 PM
Nightfall (Tzeit Hakochavim):
12:21 AM
Midnight (Chatzot HaLailah):
51:26 min.
Shaah Zmanit (proportional hour):
Events for Chabad of the Central Cascades
9:45am - 11:15am
Womens Midrash
Every Tuesday at 9:45 am - 11:15am
Studying in depth the book of Tehilim: The timeless words of Psalms give us comfort, fill us with hope and inspire us to dream. By exploring the historical and emotional contexts of King David’s poetry, we will find an even greater connection to and meaning within these special chapters.

A dose of inspiration on the weekly Parsha: The mystical and the practical
Jewish History

Moses was born in Egypt on the 7th of Adar of the year 2368 from creation (1393 BCE). According to one opinion, the year of Moses' birth was a "leap year", and he was born in the first Adar.

Moses passed away on his 120th birthday -- Adar 7, 2488 (1273 BCE)

Links:
Moses- The Man of G-d
The Birth of a Leader
The Head
Moses Disappears
More on Moses
Is it Special to Pass Away on One's Birthday?

Laws and Customs

Once a month, as the moon waxes in the sky, we recite a special blessing called Kiddush Levanah, "the sanctification of the moon," praising the Creator for His wondrous work we call astronomy.

Kiddush Levanah is recited after nightfall, usually on Saturday night. The blessing is concluded with songs and dancing, because our nation is likened to the moon—as it waxes and wanes, so have we throughout history. When we bless the moon, we renew our trust that very soon, the light of G‑d's presence will fill all the earth and our people will be redeemed from exile.

Though Kiddush Levanah can be recited as early as three days after the moon's rebirth, the kabbalah tells us it is best to wait a full week, till the seventh of the month. Once 15 days have passed, the moon begins to wane once more and the season for saying the blessing has passed.

Links:

Kiddush Levana: Sanctification of the Moon
Brief Guide to Kiddush Levanah: Thank G‑d for the Moon!

Daily Thought

"As water, face to face, so the heart of a man to his fellow."(Proverbs 27:19)

Does G‑d then laugh? Does the Infinite Light cry over failure and rejoice in success? Does He that brings time and space into existence truly love with the passion of a frail human being or feel remorse as a creature trapped within the tunnel of time?

But G‑d desired the human soul with all its struggles. And the proof: We are here.

And when G‑d conceived this being, He looked down from His lofty realm beyond love and laughter, passion and remorse, and He said, "Shall she then be alone in her place and I in mine? Is this oneness?"

So He arranged a meeting place. He determined that the boundless emotions that are the fabric of the human soul would glimmer as well within the purity of the Infinite Light.

So that in love and laughter and compassion and awe and beauty, this human creature and G‑d could find one another, and neither would be alone.

Maamar B’Sha’ah She’alah 5725.