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Discovering the Rebbe

Advice for Life: The Doctor


The Rebbe hands a dollar to a wounded Israeli, for him to give to charity. Photo: Yossi Melamed
The Rebbe hands a dollar to a wounded Israeli, for him to give to charity. Photo: Yossi Melamed

G‑d gave the doctor permission
– and by extension, the ability –
to heal.


Adapted from a letter of the Rebbe, of righteous memory.1

Footnotes
1.

Vol. 29, p. 23.

Advice for Life: Yesterday's Good


Photo Yossi Melamed/Algemeiner Journal
Photo Yossi Melamed/Algemeiner Journal

The good accomplished yesterday
has not disappeared.
The good that you need to do today
is much easier to do
when you have yesterday’s good
to support it.


Adapted from a letter of the Rebbe, of righteous memory.1

Footnotes
1.

Vol. 29, p. 166.

Advice for Life: Mother on the Job


The Rebbe hands a Tanya, the fundamental text of Chabad philosophy, to a small child held in his mother's hands (Photo: Lubavitch Archives).
The Rebbe hands a Tanya, the fundamental text of Chabad philosophy, to a small child held in his mother's hands (Photo: Lubavitch Archives).

Mothers could also be involved in the workplace,
especially in the field of education.
However, the education and upbringing of her children
always takes priority.
Every mother must calculate
how much time she should and could work.


Adapted from a letter of the Rebbe, of righteous memory.1

Footnotes
1.

Vol. 29, p. 12

Advice for Life: Never Enough

Our Sages say:
“One who has a hundred wants two hundred;
one who has two hundred wants four hundred.”1
Achievement whets the desire
for even greater achievements,
and at a faster pace.
This is true regarding material wealth,
and even more so regarding spiritual achievements,
in fulfilling G‑d’s will.

Adapted from a letter of the Rebbe, of righteous memory.2


The Rebbe, of righteous memory, motions upwards with his hands to Rabbi Yaakov Yehudah (“JJ”) Hecht following a parade to bolster to Jewish unity. Rabbi Hecht had told the Rebbe that the great turnout at the parade “pulled him out” of his unfounded worries that it would not be successful; the Rebbe responded that the turnout “uplifted him.” (Photo: A. Raskin/Lubavitch Archives)
The Rebbe, of righteous memory, motions upwards with his hands to Rabbi Yaakov Yehudah (“JJ”) Hecht following a parade to bolster to Jewish unity. Rabbi Hecht had told the Rebbe that the great turnout at the parade “pulled him out” of his unfounded worries that it would not be successful; the Rebbe responded that the turnout “uplifted him.” (Photo: A. Raskin/Lubavitch Archives)

About the photo: As the Rebbe was about to leave the Lag BaOmer parade of 5747 (1987), Rabbi JJ Hecht turned to the Rebbe and said that he hopes the Rebbe received nachas ruach [pleasure] from the parade. The Rebbe answered “Very [much so]. What about your mara-shchora [melancholy]?” (Before the parade, Rabbi Hecht had complained that the preparations were not going well and was worried about the turnout). Rabbi Hecht responded, “The Rebbe pulled me out of it,” to which the Rebbe responded (in Yiddish), with a swift raise of his hand, “Pulled you out of it? ...lifted [you] up!”

Footnotes
1.

Midrash Kohelet Rabah 1:13.

2.

Vol. 29, p. 165

"I'm Glad I Listened to the Rebbe..."

October 4, 2010 10:51 AM

This week on TheRebbe.org we are featuring, in our series of Peter Kalms's memories of his audiences with the Rebbe, an article discussing the Rebbe's opinion regarding his daughter Tanya's study in art school: My Daughter's Academic Choices.

I asked Tanya Canvasser (Kalms) to share with me her feelings about that audience. Here is her response:

There is no question that this visit to the Rebbe, of righteous memory, was a very significant event in my life.

I cannot even begin to imagine what my life would have been like had I not followed the Rebbe's advice and gone to art school.

I continued my studies in Jerusalem, ultimately meeting my husband there.

Although I always continued to do some artwork on the side, not going to art school left me open for other things.

I later became involved in education, especially preschool, both in Israel and abroad. That experience affected my personal growth and prepared me as a parent, for which I am very grateful.

After more than 30 years, I finally found an art school for religious women in Jerusalem – that I have no doubt the Rebbe would have approved of – where I was able to channel my artistic skills into training as an art teacher and silversmith.

Today, I am still living in Jerusalem, I teach painting, and work as a freelance jewelry smith.

Many have struggled to describe Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, of righteous memory, the seventh leader of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement. A task so daunting due to the multifariousness of the Rebbe’s personality and achievements.

Rather than attempting to describe the Rebbe, this forum will share hitherto unknown tidbits of information about his life and teachings — information that was recorded in writing, audio and video.

Join us as we explore the Rebbe’s life and teachings. Manuscripts, letters, firsthand experiences and more.
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