Enter your email address to get our weekly email with fresh, exciting and thoughtful content that will enrich your inbox and your life.
Register for Course »
The Chabad.org Blog

Traffic Lights: Pro or Con?

June 28, 2015

Dear Friend,

I spent a whole lot of time this morning in an awful traffic jam. As the cars inched forward, I wondered what was holding us up. Was it roadwork, or something more sinister? Should I check Waze? Then I finally saw the problem: a traffic light wasn’t working. Those wishing to cross the intersection were making baby advances into the melee, and those poor people needing to turn left . . . I fear they may still be waiting.

That got me thinking that one of the most important things we can do as parents is create “traffic lights” for our children, telling them what is red and what is green. What is allowed and what isn’t, where to go and which lines not to cross. And there are the yellow lights as well, some of which are to be treated as red, and others which are okay in a pinch.

Come to think of it, we adults can probably use a few internal traffic lights as well.

Have a great week.

Mendy Kaminker,
on behalf of the Chabad.org Editorial Team

P.S.: What do you think about internal traffic lights? Pro or con, or perhaps this is a “yellow”? Please share your thoughts in the comments section.

The “Leap Second” and What It Means to You

June 25, 2015 1:46 PM

Listen up, everyone: a very important event is about to take place. Take out your calendars . . . actually, take out your watches, because you will have to set them. We are about to gain one whole second!

It’s called a “leap second,” and it happens once every ten years. For those who are not familiar with the term (I wasn’t either), on June 30 a second will be inserted into our day, to help reconcile the slight discrepancies between the atomic clock and actual solar time.

So the big question is: what are we going to do with that second?

You see, in the old days a second wasn’t worth much. It was just a second, some minuscule unit of time that passes so fast we don’t even realize it. But we live in a different world. One second is exactly 1/15th of an Instagram video, 1/7th of a Vine. And you gotta agree that when your entire video is 7 seconds, every second is very important. Our attention span is much shorter, so each second is much more valuable.

I am not sure we can really plan how to use that one extra second we are gaining, but I am sure we can start adding good to our lives in small bites.

Take, for example, the way you approach a new mitzvah. It’s perfectly okay to say, “I’ll start learning Torah one minute per day,” “I will dedicate two minutes to prayer,” or “I will think for a few minutes about my children’s Jewish education” (yes, that’s a mitzvah too).

Because a second used is a second earned.

“Daily Wisdom” for All!

June 21, 2015

Dear Friend,

One of the earliest features on Chabad.org—harking back to the days of desktops and dialup—has been our daily study section, where people learn the day’s portions of Torah, Tanya, Hayom Yom, Psalms, and Maimonides’ Mishneh Torah, following the syllabus instituted by the Chabad rebbes.

We are very pleased to tell you about the latest addition to this venerable collection. “Daily Wisdom” is a companion to the daily Torah portion, bringing you a thoughtful and inspiring teaching on the portion, distilled from of the writings and talks of the Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, of righteous memory.

The teachings were rendered by Rabbi Moshe Wisnefsky, produced in book form by Chabad House Publications of California, and published by Kehot Publication Society.

Click here to sample it, and see for yourself why this feature has already won awards and wide acclaim.

Want to see it daily? Click here to get it delivered to your inbox, or download our Hayom App and access it there.

Enjoy!

The Chabad.org Editorial Team

A Remarkable Thing Happened This Week

June 16, 2015 5:02 PM

Dear Friend,

Something remarkable happened in Israel this week.

No, archaeologists have not uncovered a bronze proto–chicken soup pot, and no one has discovered a way to make Egged bus drivers slow down on hairpin turns. Yet what happened was so predictable that no one could have predicted it.

No less than 27 members of the Knesset (Israel’s parliament, famous for holding frank disagreements on just about everything) got together for a session honoring Chabad’s growing contributions to Israeli—and world—society.

Speaker after speaker, from across the Israeli political spectrum, took to the podium to share his or her impressions of the Rebbe’s unifying impact on Jewish life and on their personal lives.

How did the Rebbe do it? How could one person’s message resonate with such a diverse group of individuals? Perhaps the answer is as simple as one word: light.

There is a Yiddish saying, “Light draws near.” When you light a candle, people come close to bask in its glow. The Rebbe held aloft a candle of Torah light, illuminating, comforting and guiding each and every individual.

This Shabbat is the Rebbe’s 21st yahrtzeit. What better time is there for us to lift our own torches high, sharing this message of unity, empowerment and transformation with everyone around us?

Menachem Posner,
on behalf of the Chabad.org Editorial Team

‘Daily Wisdom’ From the Rebbe a Rich Addition to Chabad.org’s ‘Daily Study’ Section

Torah inspiration and teachings at the click of a mouse or tap of a finger

June 16, 2015 2:41 PM
'Daily Wisdom' was the gold winner in the religion category of the prestigious 2015 Benjamin Franklin Awards.
'Daily Wisdom' was the gold winner in the religion category of the prestigious 2015 Benjamin Franklin Awards.

Who wouldn’t want an instant—and now electronically accessible—snippet of invaluable wisdom?

Daily Wisdom, an anthology of 378 daily inspirational lessons culled from the vast and deep Torah teachings of the Lubavitcher Rebbe—Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, of righteous memory—is the latest addition to the Chabad.org’s “Daily Study” section, one of the most popular sections of the website.

The lessons in Daily Wisdom are apportioned according to the day-to-day study cycle of the Torah’s weekly portion. The teachings were adapted into English by Rabbi Moshe Wisnefsky and produced in book form by Chabad House Publications of California. It was published by Kehot Publication Society in July of 2014.

Following the book’s initial success, it was republished in a compact format as the Asher David Milstein Edition. It became the gold winner in the religion category of the prestigious 2015 Benjamin Franklin Awards a few months later.

In addition to being fully accessible online at TheRebbe.org, the teachings have also been incorporated into Chabad.org’s “Hayom” app, which brings together halachic times, daily study, inspiration, yarhtzeits and Hebrew birthdays for an all-inclusive Chabad.org app experience.

Subscribers also can receive each day’s wisdom in their inbox every day (except for Shabbat and Jewish holidays) by signing up for a special daily email. To subscribe to the daily mailing click here.

The teachings are intended to serve as a companion to the full text of the daily portion of the Torah, which is customarily studied along with Rashi’s classic commentary. In addition, each teaching is preceded by a brief summary of the day’s Torah portion.

“The Rebbe’s inspirational teachings are a relevant and living source of insight and comfort,” noted Rabbi Chaim Nochum Cunin, director of Chabad House Publications. “Daily Wisdom is a vehicle through which thousands of people are now being personally impacted by these teachings. Having them on the web makes this inspiration that much more accessible to all.”

In addition to being fully accessible online at TheRebbe.org, the teachings have also been incorporated into Chabad.org’s “Hayom” app, and are available through a daily email subscription.
In addition to being fully accessible online at TheRebbe.org, the teachings have also been incorporated into Chabad.org’s “Hayom” app, and are available through a daily email subscription.

The Spies in Our Lives

June 7, 2015 12:23 PM

Dear Friend,

Every complete lifetime is lived in three stages—childhood, adolescence and adulthood—and the Torah’s wisdom, from the practical to the esoteric, is an extended guide to how we and our children can most meaningfully navigate through each stage of life.

At its core, childhood is marked by dependence, adolescence by independence, and adulthood by interdependence.

This week we read the story of the spies—twelve elders and leaders who were dispatched to the land of Canaan and returned with a report that predicted complete failure—a conclusion that led to the rebellion of thousands. At the root of the spies’ complaint was the fact that they really didn’t want to grow up and grow the world. They wanted to continue to live entirely spiritual lives as man-children, where everything was handed to them from Above, where they would not be called on to use their effort and creative intelligence to proactively improve and perfect the world in which they lived.

The subsequent rebellion of the masses against, Moses, Aaron, the Torah’s promises, even G‑d Himself, was a model of irrational adolescent behavior, an obstinate, thoughtless rejection of that which they needed and would always need.

It’s a good reminder that a joyous, fulfilled, adult life can result only by happily embracing what we truly need in life—G‑d, the Torah, and each other—so we can interdependently raise up the world.

Yaakov Ort,
on behalf of the Chabad.org Editorial Team

2015 Rockower Award for Excellence in News Reporting to Chabad.org

Writer Dovid Margolin’s article on decision allowing bearded rabbis in U.S. military gains first place

June 2, 2015 5:05 PM
The award-winning article by Dovid Margolin featured decisions within the U.S. military to allow bearded rabbis to serve as chaplains and the impact this new development will likely have on Jewish life in the U.S. armed services.
The award-winning article by Dovid Margolin featured decisions within the U.S. military to allow bearded rabbis to serve as chaplains and the impact this new development will likely have on Jewish life in the U.S. armed services.

The American Jewish Press Association has announced that Chabad.org and writer Dovid Margolin have won the first-place Simon Rockower Award for Excellence in News Reporting for work done in 2014.

The award was given for New Pentagon Directive Opens Door for More Jewish Chaplains, an in-depth article on recent decisions within the U.S. military to allow bearded rabbis to serve as chaplains and the resulting impact this new development will likely have on Jewish life in the U.S. armed services.

As stated in the story, which was published in the news section of Chabad.org: “With a sorely felt shortage of Jewish chaplains throughout the military, the rule change is expected to pave the way for the enlistment of bearded rabbis as military chaplains, a near impossible goal under the previously strict grooming code.”

Now in its 34th year, the Rockowers are seen as the gold standard of journalism in the Jewish world.

Chabad.org—with more than 43 million unique visitors in 2014 and dedicated to the educational vision of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, of righteous memory—is the premier provider of Jewish content on the web.

The site has received prominent acclaim from numerous national and international media outlets, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA TODAY, UPI, The Village Voice, Time, Wired, ABC (“Good Morning America”), CBS, CNN, Fox Network and PBS.

“We strive to maintain the highest professional standards in our news section, as we do on the entire site as a whole,” says senior editor Yaakov Ort, who directs www.Chabad.org/News. “We’re grateful for the recognition of journalistic excellence that the award highlights.”

The awards—one to Chabad.org and one to Margolin—will be presented at a special ceremony during the Jewish Federation’s annual General Assembly, to be held this year from Nov. 8-10 in Washington, D.C.

The latest news from Chabad.org.
Recent Posts
Blog Archive
Related Topics