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There are those who question: “Why do you speak so much about bringing Moshiach?” “Why don’t you rely on G-d – after all, He’s the one Who sent us into Exile in the first place!”

You Have to Ask for Moshiach

You Have to Ask for Moshiach

Pesach Sheni, 5744 · May 16, 1984

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You Have to Ask for Moshiach: Pesach Sheni, 5744 · May 16, 1984

There are those who question: “Why do you speak so much about bringing Moshiach?” “Why don’t you rely on G-d – after all, He’s the one Who sent us into Exile in the first place!”
Lubavitcher Rebbe, Redemption, Yearning for and Anticipating
You Have to Ask for Moshiach
Pesach Sheni, 5744 · May 16, 1984
Disc 76, Program 301

Event Date: 14 Iyar 5744 - May 16, 1984

There are those who question: “Why do you speak so much about bringing Moshiach?” “Why don’t you rely on G-d – after all, He’s the one Who sent us into Exile in the first place!”

If the Jewish People in the time of Moses had followed this line of logic, at least one Mitzvah in the Torah would not have been given when it was. The Second Passover was given as a response to those who cried out to G-d over their plight.

Three times every day, a Jew begs G-d in the Amidah prayer: “May the scion of David, Your servant, flourish,” “We await Your salvation all day long.” The Midrash explains that the Jews – so to speak – take G-d by the hand and guide Him where to go. When Jews say that G-d “does not slumber or sleep” then “The Lord awakens as from slumber.” Likewise, the Midrash states, when Jews demand Redemption it comes earlier than it otherwise would.

Maimonides rules that whenever a Jew feels some lacking, he is obligated to pray and ask G-d to fill his needs. So if one feels that he is lacking Redemption then he is obligated by the Torah to ask at every opportunity, whenever it is time to pray, that G-d should fill this lacking!

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ruth housman marshfield hills, MA June 14, 2010

you have to ask Yes, I think it's important we all perform acts of kindness and that we make the assumption this one act has tipped the scale to allow the entrance of the Messiah. I find these words certainly make sense. We must each act, in fact, and I do believe this, as if we were the messiah.

For me it's about big and small acts of kindness. I don't know why it's so hard for people to get this right after all this time.

I do deeply and humbly believe we're going to do it together, meaning move into a new state of consciousness and a new way, that the Rebbe refers to as Redemption.

I think God has a sense of humor also, and I believe there's a massive story that is going to unfold that has everything to do with this topic. I live in the metaphor and so I look to the year 2020 which does mean, Perfect Vision.

I don't believe Promises are made by God that are not ultimately, kept. I love it that there's a play on Broadway called Promises, Promises right now Reply

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