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Balak Haftorah in a Nutshell

Balak Haftorah in a Nutshell

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Micah 5:6-6:8.

This week's haftorah makes mention of the incident of Balak the king of Moab hiring the sorcerer Balaam to curse the Jewish people -- the main topic of this week's Torah reading.

The prophet Micah prophesies about what will occur after the war of Gog and Magog, the war which precedes the coming of the Messiah and the Final Redemption.

"And the remnant of Jacob shall be in the midst of many peoples -- like dew sent by G‑d, like torrents of rain upon vegetation that does not hope for any man and does not wait for the sons of men." The prophet describes how G‑d will remove the idols and sorcerers and how He will destroy the Jews' enemies.

The prophet Micah then goes on to rebuke the Jewish people for not observing G‑d's commandments, calling as witness the "mountains and hills" -- a reference to the Patriarchs and Matriarchs -- and reminding them of the great things G‑d had done for them. He took them out of Egypt and replaced the curses that Balaam son of Beor wanted to utter against them with blessings.

The Jewish people respond by saying that they do not know how to serve G‑d and ask for guidance. The prophet reminds them of the Torah, and that all they need to do is contained within it: "He has told you, O man, what is good, and what G‑d demands of you: but to do justice, love kindness, and walk discreetly with your G‑d."

This is a synopsis of the Haftorah that is read in Chabad synagogues. Other communities could possibly read more, less, or a different section of the Prophets altogether.
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Discussion (3)
June 27, 2010
RE: walk discreetly
That is certainly a good interpretation of these words. I have seen many of the commentaries explain it to mean that we should not make a big deal about our service of G-d and how pious we are.
Menachem Posner for Chabad.org
June 26, 2010
walk discreetly
Is "walking discreetly" being humble in our interactions among people and giving credit to G-d?
David
Brandon, MS
June 22, 2010
What to do???
I often ask G-d what to do?
And here I've found the best answer.

The Jewish people respond by saying that they do not know how to serve G‑d and ask for guidance. The prophet reminds them of the Torah, and that all they need to do is contained within it: "He has told you, O man, what is good, and what G‑d demands of you: but to do justice, love kindness, and walk discreetly with your G‑d."
Thsi is all that we have to do.
Thank you Aba (Father).
Dan
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