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Nephilim: Fallen Angels, Giants or Men?

Nephilim: Fallen Angels, Giants or Men?

The mystery of Genesis 6:1–4

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Just before the story of Noah’s ark, the Torah presents a cryptic narrative that has mystified and intrigued scholars for generations:

And it came to pass when man commenced to multiply upon the face of the earth, and daughters were born to them, that the benei elokim saw the daughters of man when they were beautifying themselves, and they took for themselves wives from whomever they chose. And the L‑rd said, “Let My spirit not quarrel forever concerning man, because he is also flesh, and his days shall be a hundred and twenty years." The nephilim were on the earth in those days, and also afterward, when the benei elokim would come to the daughters of man, and they would bear for them; they are the mighty men, who were of old, the men of renown. (Genesis 6:1–4)

Who or what exactly are the benei elokim? Who are the nephilim? How are they related to each other? And what does it all mean?

One thing benei elokim does not mean is “sons of G‑d.” In fact, Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai would “curse” anyone who translated the term benei elokim as the “sons of G‑d.”1 The word elokim in Scripture, while generally referring to G‑d, is in essence merely an expression of authority.2 Similarly, the term benei does not necessarily mean “sons,” but is often just a title. Benei chorin, for example, means those who are free—not “sons of freedom.”

Nephilim seems to be derived from the verb-root naphal, meaning “fall.” From where did they fall? Are they the same as the benei elokim? And if so, why are they called by two names?

The Midrash and commentaries offer three explanations:

Explanation 1: Angels taking a risk

The Midrash3 relates that when the generation of the Flood went astray, G‑d began to regret having created man. Then two angels, Shamchazai and Azael,4 came before G‑d and said, “Did we not warn You before You created man, saying, ‘What is man, that You should be mindful of him?’”5 G‑d replied: “Then what shall become of the world?” “We will suffice instead,” they replied. G‑d answered, “I know that would you live on that world, the evil inclination would rule you just as much as it controls man, but you would be even worse.” But the angels persisted, saying: “Let us descend to the world of men, and we will show You how we will sanctify your name.” And G-d said: “Go down and dwell among them.”

Sure enough, as soon as the angels descended, their evil inclination overpowered them.6 When they saw the beautiful “daughters of man,”7 they became corrupted and sinned with them. They and their descendants are the nephilim, the giants and mighty ones referred to later on in the narrative.8

This story is often seen as support for the notion of “fallen angels.” But a careful reading reveals that this is not the case. G‑d sent them down knowing full well—and indeed expecting—that they would end up sinning.

In fact, in Judaism there is no such thing as fallen angels or conflict in heaven. There is only one Creator in charge of it all, with no forces opposing Him. Even “Satan” is merely the name of an angel whose divinely assigned task is to tempt people to sin.9

While the Midrash’s description of the benei elokim and the nephilim as angels and giants is perhaps the most popular reading, it is not necessarily the most literal one.10

Explanation 2: Corrupt Authorities

Based on a more literal translation of benei elokim, many explain that the term is simply referring to princes, noblemen or judges11 who abused their power, raping anyone they fancied, and forcing any women who got married to have relations with them first.12 This, together with their many other sins, were what eventually led to the great flood.13

There are, however, differences of opinion as to whether the nephilim are simply the benei elokim after they had “fallen,” or if the term refers to the descendants of these bnei elokim.14

Explanation 3: Fallen Humans

Finally, there others who take a different approach and explain benei elokim to mean people who were—at least to begin with—on a spiritually high level. They are later called nephilim, for they or their descendants (or both) fell from their spiritual heights, became corrupted, and eventually brought G‑d’s wrath upon themselves by robbing, murdering and raping without hesitation.15

We end up with several reasons why these beings are called nephilim:

1. Because they fell from their greatness.16

2. Because they caused the world to fall.17

3. Because they caused the hearts of people to fall, trembling before their great stature.18

4. Because they fell from heaven—although not without their consent.19

5. Nephilim is Hebrew for “giants”—which they were, either in stature, in authority or in spiritual greatness.20

Angels Versus Souls

We meet the nephilim again, much later, when Moses sends spies to the land of Canaan. The spies were great men, but they returned with a report that struck terror into the hearts of the Israelites, appending their own opinion that the mission of occupying this land would be futile.

Quite tellingly, they made sure to report on these angels who had fallen from heaven—perhaps because they themselves feared meeting the same fate. After all, the wilderness of Sinai was pretty much a heaven for them, with little else to do than contemplate G‑d’s Torah and His wonders. Entering the land of Canaan to conquer, work the land and harvest its produce threatened to be a tremendous descent.

The difference, however, is that the human soul is not an angel. The human soul is called a neshamah, meaning a breath, as in the verse that tells of how, when G‑d created Adam, “He blew into his nostrils the breath of life.”

An angel falls below and is disconnected. A breath, however, can never be disconnected. No matter where it may end up, how low it may have stooped, the neshamah is intrinsically bound to its origin above, and from there it receives the power to shine, even in the darkest and lowest time and place, and return to its true essence.21

FOOTNOTES
1.

Genesis Rabbah 26:5.
As we shall see, Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai himself explains (ibid.) that benei elokim means judges. However, his cursing those who translate it as “sons of G‑d” is not meant in reference to the opinion that they are angels, for (a) this opinion is found in many places in the works of the sages, including the Talmud, so it does not seem probable that he would curse those who hold so widely accepted an opinion (see footnote 5); (b) the Zohar (1:37a) quotes this explanation without any negative comments.
For more on this, see Rabbi Menachem Kasher, Torah Sheleimah, Genesis 6:2, note 9.

2.

Thus we find G‑d telling Moses (Exodus 4:16; see also Exodus 7:1) that “he [Aaron] will be your speaker, and you will be his elokim [i.e., leader].”

3.

This Midrash can be found with variations in a number of places in the Talmud and Midrash, including Talmud, Yoma 67b; Targum Yonatan ben Uziel to Genesis 6:4; Pirkei d’Rabbi Eliezer 22; Zohar 1:37a; and Yalkut Shimoni, Bereishit, remez 44. See also Torah Sheleimah, Genesis 6:1–4, for additional citations.

4.

The Talmud, Yoma ibid., gives alternative names for the two angels. See Likkutei Sichot, vol. 28, p. 85, for a discussion of this issue.

5.

Psalms 8:5.

6.

For more on whether angels can sin, see Can Angels Sin?

7.

Genesis 6:2.

8.

The Talmud, Niddah 61a, explains that Og (who was a giant, and one of their descendants) survived the great flood by holding onto Noah’s ark and staying close to it.

9.

Talmud, Bava Batra 16a.

10.

See Rashi on Genesis 6:2 and 6:4; see also Likkutei Sichot cited above.

11.

We find the term elokim used many times as a reference to judges; see for example, Exodus 21:6.

12.

See Targum Yonatan ben Uziel to Genesis 6:4; Genesis Rabbah 26:5; and most of the commentaries (including that of Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi) to Genesis 6:2. Some are of the opinion that it refers specifically to either the descendants of Cain (Zohar 1:37a) or Seth (Hamek Davar to Genesis 6:4).

13.

It should be noted that while according to this approach the term benei elokim is understood to refer to princes, noblemen and judges, the term nephilim may very well still be referring to angels and giants. See, for example, Targum Yonatan ben Uziel to Genesis 6:2 and 6:4.

14.

See supercommentaries of Nachalat Yaakov and Be’er Basadeh to Rashi, Genesis 6:4.

15.

Ha'emek Davar, ibid.

16.

Genesis Rabbah 26:7.

17.

Ibid.; see Rashi to Genesis 6:4, in which he combines these first two explanations.

18.

See commentaries of Rabbi Avraham ibn Ezra, Rabbi David Kimchi (Radak) and Rabbi Moshe ben Nachman (Ramban) to Genesis 6:4.

19.

Rashi to Numbers 13:33, and Nachalat Yaakov to Genesis 6:4. See, however, Likkutei Sichot, vol. 28, p. 86.

20.

Pirkei d’Rabbi Eliezer, ch. 22.

21.

See Likutei Sichot, ibid.

Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin responds to questions for Chabad.org's Ask the Rabbi service.
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Discussion (17)
February 11, 2014
Nephilim
It seems to be impossible, but before Noah's flood these giants were only evil and "encouraged" people to do so as well. It was also "a polution" into the human race. Noah was a righteous man in the eyes of G-d! But he was also "pure"! Not defiled with the evil from that time!
Paul van Beek
Lakeland; Florida
October 7, 2013
a subject that's very deep and complex
Nephilim, Anakim and other products of cross breeding were unlike humans because angels don't have the same kind of soul like humans. I doubt very much that anyone is a product of Nepheliim or any other giants. Some Greek manuscripts describe them as very noisy. They were all destroyed. Remember too that the angels that produced such hideous monsters were not the regular kind. They were a specific kind of angel that are relegated to the lowest compartment in Gehena after the flood. There was a gene pool problem before the Great Flood. Cross breeding was occurring on all levels, even among plants. Thus, as Bereshit states, all living things were corrupt. Humans were exceedingly violent and sexually deviant. Horrible things were occurring that can't be mentioned. A lot of this information was quite prevalent among many cultures including the Hebrews. The books of Jasher, Enoch and some others discuss some of this phenomena. And no, this isn't mythology.
Anonymous
October 6, 2013
So interesting
Heather
Richmond Hill
October 30, 2012
What about the explanation that the nephilim were the sons of Seth that sinned because they rebelliously mingled with the daughters of Cain? According to this view, why was Noah not punished for marrying Naamah a descendent of Cain?
Gershom
Spain
October 24, 2012
Rashi
Rashi states that the term Elochim should be translated as nobles. So they were sort of rulers.
Anonymous
October 22, 2012
strange as it may seem
Genesis 1,and 2 both describe the creation of man the later describes the breath of life. Cain later takes a wife from the people in the wilderness. I heard one commentary stating that other human like creatures were around since the beginning later described as giants. They also described these beings as not having spirits like ourselves. This description seems to fit the scriptures better than any I have heard to date. It is impossible to really know without being there, but archeology evidence would seem to confirm this theory.
Just some food for thought.
Joe
Reno , nv
October 20, 2012
Benei elokim
Regarding this interpretation, the two angels Shamchazai and Azael were sent later when the Benei Elokim were long existed on the earth, therefore they really the son's of G-d, who were fall.
Anonymous
Rzeszow
October 19, 2012
nephilim
I was taught that angels were asexual? No disrespect, but I do not feel that the question was answered. Are angels able to be sexual or not? The "giants" came from somewhere - but where?
Anonymous
October 18, 2012
Giants, dinosaurs, etc...
This is a most excellent article, and a proper place to share a possible theory I've developed. Kabbalistic wisdom teaches that the highest angels have no ratzon, or will of their own, but serve purely only the will and purpose of YHVH. The lower angels operate from the two lower realms (Assiyah and Yetzirah) and like humans, tend to be prone to both good and evil inclinations. So my theory... is it possible that dinosaurs and other gigantic creations were a result of this forbidden union (angel + man, profane + holy) ? Could this union have affected the entire creation ? Thus the severity of the flood ? Example : a lion and a tiger can create offspring called a 'Liger'. It's bigger than both parents, but it cannot reproduce. Hmm...
Stefanos
Inglewood , Ca
chabadsb.org
October 18, 2012
Other Lifeforms
Isn't it uncle Joshua who send in the spies? To discover the land was occupied by tall creatures, the Anakim....Were the Anakim related to the Annunaki? If there is an intanglible concept of the human mind that has caused soo much misery it is the concept of "angels" fiddling with mankind. Gabri_el is notorious: It gave us Christianity and islam, most dreadful inventions, While Judaism was a tribal lifestyle today it is a religion in defense mode. Assuming that all the details presented are real entities, it would simply mean that there are other lifeforms operating on different levels of awareness and knowledge,. The Anakim were considered tall while the 2 men Joshua send in Canaan to spy are lilliputters by comparison. :-- a bunch of grapes carried by 2 men! -Tribal Israel were little people. These other lifeforms are capable of intense ruthlessness and cruelty inflicting upon mankind. Lets wake up and smell the coffee. Time to shed mental slavery
LRoche
NY
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