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The Talmud teaches that the mitzvah of loving your fellow Jew is the entirety of Torah. How could this mitzvah that’s between man and man encompass all of Torah that’s between man and G‑d?

Loving Your Fellow as Yourself

Loving Your Fellow as Yourself

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Loving Your Fellow as Yourself

The Talmud teaches that the mitzvah of loving your fellow Jew is the entirety of Torah. How could this mitzvah that’s between man and man encompass all of Torah that’s between man and G‑d?
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Tanya, Ahavat Yisrael
Michael Chighel (Kigel) received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Toronto for his dissertation on the Book of Job, after a specialization in 20th-century French and German thought. In Canada he taught in the departments of philosophy and of Jewish studies at the universities of York, Queen’s and Waterloo. He produced Passages and Messages for eleven seasons on Canadian television (CTS). Until this year he held the Rohr Chair of Jewish Studies at the Lauder Business School in Vienna, where he taught Torah, European ethics and political economy. He has translated a number of books and published various articles in Jewish thought. Michael and his family have recently made aliyah, and now live in Jerusalem.
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Paul Bourgeois October 1, 2014

"Hillel said that which you detest do not do to your fellow man." Hillel in Pirke Avot said to understand others you have to walk in their shoes. Understand what hurts you and don't do it to others. This is compassion, but compassion based on fear of God. It is easy to love, because that is selfish. It is harder not to hurt, because that requires seeing yourself in others and knowing,"Though I may or may not like you or and so not benefit from our relationship, nonetheless I can see myself in you and in hurting you I hurt myself." Reply

leon roiter barranquilla September 30, 2014

kipur You hurt your self when you do not accept your self as A´Shem made you. Yom hakipurim was designed to forgive your self for attemting aginst A´Shem´s design. A´Shem made you with all the necessary tools recquired to realize all your dreams.Yom hakipurim was designed to help you forgive yourself for all the thoughts you have created to keep you from fullfilling A´Shem´s wish. Forgive yourself for not believing in yourself for thinking you are not capable, for believing you are not limitless. your were made a bit inferior than angels. you were made by A´shem´s hands.


Leon Roiter Reply

Anonymous September 29, 2014

Hillel said don't hurt others. Reply

zeynep September 4, 2011

Let us be cautious of overgeneralizations Rabbi Kaplan, not all of us suffer from a distorted self-love blinding us to healthy self-judgment. Some of us suffer from a lack of healthy self-love leading us to distorted self-judgments. Both cases, by projection, cause distorted judgments of others.

The commandment 'Love your fellow as you love yourself' implies an axiomatic self-love that is invested in us,which nevertheless has to be unearthed.This unearthing is the very process of recognizing the G-dly spark within us and thus coming to love G-d in ourselves.Only then can we start to attempt to fulfill the mitzvah of recognizing and loving the G-dliness invested in our fellow Jew.

I perceive the issues raised by Rabbi Kigel relating to the spousal relation to be extremely valid. Perhaps the concept of 'the bashert' can help us to further elucidate this category of human relations.

I look forward to reading Chapter 32 in Tanya. Thank you both. Reply

leon roiter barranquilla, colombia April 10, 2010

love your self Can you love your fellow man eventhough you do not love your self.

To love your fellow man you have to love yourself first. You have to accept yourself as you are before you accept others as they are. Reply

laurie claus January 19, 2010

Articles with Mendel Kaplan, Michael Kigel & Manis Thank you for these uplifting thoughts, isn't the thought that G-d wants us to allow the needs wants, desires, we have for ourselves likewise for our fellow, I think? Reply

Host, Michael Chighel, talks to some of the world's greatest experts about the masterpiece of Hasidic thought, the book of Tanya.
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