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Our proverbial New Year for Trees is celebrated by most Sephardic Jews (and more recently by many Israelis of Ashkenazi descent as well) with an elaborate fruit-centric sacred ceremony colloquially known as the “Tu B’Shevat Seder.” It’s comprised of carefully choreographed chanting of Scripture and Rabbinic texts, accompanied by an assortment of fruit and wine, which are consumed in an orderly fashion. But why invoke unique Passover verbiage for this fruitful observance? This fascinating presentation sheds light on some of the origins and profound meanings of this enigmatic Torah tradition.

The 15th of Shevat Seder

The 15th of Shevat Seder

The origin and meaning of this custom

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The 15th of Shevat Seder: The origin and meaning of this custom

Our proverbial New Year for Trees is celebrated by most Sephardic Jews (and more recently by many Israelis of Ashkenazi descent as well) with an elaborate fruit-centric sacred ceremony colloquially known as the “Tu B’Shevat Seder.” It’s comprised of carefully choreographed chanting of Scripture and Rabbinic texts, accompanied by an assortment of fruit and wine, which are consumed in an orderly fashion. But why invoke unique Passover verbiage for this fruitful observance? This fascinating presentation sheds light on some of the origins and profound meanings of this enigmatic Torah tradition.
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15 Shevat
Rabbi Mendel Kaplan is the founder and spiritual leader of Chabad Flamingo in Thornhill, Ontario, he also serves as a Chaplain of the York Regional Police Service.
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