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Rabbi Yehudah HaNassi put the Oral Torah down on paper in the year 212, in the form known as the Mishnah. What prompted this radical move in the history of Jewish literacy? What constitutes the Mishnah? And what is its function in the Tradition?

Lesson 6. Boiling Point: The Mishnah Is Written

Lesson 6. Boiling Point: The Mishnah Is Written

Scroll Down - Part 6

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Discussion (25)
July 26, 2016
Opening Music
Dear Dana, the short musical refrain off the top and at the end of Scroll Down is a small segment from an old Andalusian Jewish song known as "Quando el rei Nimrod." This particular version is based on a recording made for me by David Paoli playing the Oud.
Michael Chighel
Jerusalem
July 25, 2016
The Opening/Closing Music ?
Dear Michael, In addition to enjoying this series and the style in which you present it, I am really diggin' the 'theme' music you have chosen for it. Could you please share the name of it? I would very much like to get it so I can listen to it at home on my stereo. Is it a CD?
Dana
Belmont, CA
July 20, 2016
human nature
ב״ה

i can only find one fault
with all of the teachings
you have presented so far

on the other side of the coin
what if just one rabbi (just one)
got something wrong
we would never know about it
because
no one would ever question a rabbi

think about something i wrote
"all humans have a flaw
HaShem does not"
^ even a rabbi ^

otherwise
this course is a great learning experience

דוד פרן

שלום עליכם
David Fern
32904
July 11, 2016
Blessings Michael,

You are a mensch! Thank you so much.

Your classes bring knowledge in a simple, fun way that makes a beginner want more. I appreciate this series and hope to see more.

Sincerely,

Rick Miller
Rick Miller
La Mesa, California
July 10, 2016
120 names
Hello -

I enjoyed the list of sages/scholars/rabbis. Yes, I would actually loved to have seen all 120 names and time periods. 120 is not very many.
Erika
USA
July 10, 2016
EXCELLENT SERIES
I FIND THIS SERIES GREAT! IT HAS EXPLAINED CONCEPTS TO ME (THAT I DID NOT TRUELY UNDERSTAND) IN AN ENTERTAINING WAY. I HOPE THAT RABBI WILL CONTINUE THIS AND MAYBE START OTHER CLASSES FOR ME AND OTHERS TO LEARN FROM.
MIKE
florida
July 10, 2016
"Author/s" of the Mishna
Dear Avi,

If I understand you correctly, you are referring to the anonymous rulings ("סתם משנה") in the Mishna. In Sanhedrin 86a, Rabbi Yochanan says: “An anonymous mishnah comes from Rabbi Meir; an anonymous tosefta comes from Rabbi Nehemiah ... and all are taught according to the views of Rabbi Akiba.” Whence Rabbi Sherira Gaon (10th cent.) concluded in his well-known epistle that Rabbi Meir was the author of an earlier collection of mishnayot.

What would constitute such “authorship” is hardly clear however. It’s hardly possible to say that Rabbi Meir, or Rabbi Akiva his teacher, invented their mishnayot. Sherira Gaon himself stresses this in his Iggeret. In general, to “author” a piece of mishna is always in some ways tantamout to citing a previous authority. And ultimately the whole Mishna was authored by G-d Himself at Sinai as the Oral Law. Perhaps this is why Jewish authors are called mechabrim, “connectors” or “anthologizers.”

For practical purposes, in any case, the account given by Maimonides in his introduction to his Mishne Torah sums up the problem and confirms the primary architectural role of Rabbi Yehudah (Rabbeinu HaKadosh) in constructing the Mishna:

“Rabbenu Hakadosh composed the Mishnah [רבינו הקדוש חיבר המשנה].From the days of Moses, our teacher, until Rabbenu Hakadosh, no one had composed a text for the purpose of teaching the Oral Law in public. Instead, in each generation, the head of the court or the prophet of that generation would take notes of the teachings which he received from his masters for himself, and teach them verbally in public. Similarly, according to his own potential, each individual would write notes for himself of what he heard regarding the explanation of the Torah, its laws, and the new concepts that were deduced in each generation concerning laws that were not communicated by the oral tradition, but rather deduced using one of the thirteen principles of Biblical exegesis and accepted by the high court.”
Michael Chighel
Jerusalem
July 8, 2016
If I can .....
If I can give more than two Thumps up I would, but thank G-d I only have two hands ^^^^^^^
Thank you keep me up to date!
Alexander
NYC
July 8, 2016
disrespecful
I was very disturbed to hear you refer to Native American prayer for rain as "hocus pocus voo doo stuff". I found it to be most disrespectful and condescending. I'm sure that our prayers (as a fellow Jew) sound as strange to non Jews. You may not agree with their way but it is not up to you or anyone else to mock another religion..
Denise Matis
Sunnyside
July 8, 2016
Thank you, you make the lessons so great and I enjoy the way you teach them.
Howard Wright
Jacksonville, Al.36265
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