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Take a journey through the Jewish Calendar and learn more about the significance of the customs and practices of Jewish Holidays.

Jewish Holiday Audio Classes

Jewish Holiday Audio Classes

Holiday audio classes, songs and MP3 downloads to help you prepare for the Jewish Holidays

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Take a journey through the Jewish calendar and get an elementary overview of the Jewish holidays and their customs. This class is the forth of a six-part lecture series titled ‘The Essentials,’ which introduces the foundations of Jewish life and living.
Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and the Ten Days of Atonement
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, celebrates the creation of the world and is a time for reflection on the year past. Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, is the most solemn day of the Jewish year.
Sukkot and Simchat Torah are festivals when we rejoice and celebrate. Sukkot has the special mitzvos of eating in the Sukah and shaking the Lulav and Etrog. And Simchat Torah when we rejoice with the Torah.
The "New Year" of Chassidism
The 19th day of the Hebrew month of Kislev marks the "birth" of Chassidism: the day it was allowed to emerge from the womb of mysticism into the light of day.
Chanukah commemorates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem after the defeat of the Syrians who had defiled the Holy Temple and attempted to force the Jews to assimilate. It is celebrated for eight days by kindling the menorah each evening.
The 15 of Shevat marks the beginning of the "New Year for Trees."
Purim is observed each year on the 14th of Adar, celebrating the deliverance of the Jewish people from the wicked Haman in the days of Queen Esther of Persia, as described in the book of Esther.
Passover celebrates the deliverance of the Jewish people from slavery in Egypt. One of the major mitzvos of this holiday is the prohibition against eating any leavened products and the commandment to eat Passover Matzos.
The 33rd day of the Omer commemorates the end of a plague which killed thousands of Rabbi Akiva’s students and also the yahrzeit of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, author of the Zohar.
Sefirat Haomer
We count the Omer for 49 days from the second day of Passover until the holiday of Shavuot in anticipation of the giving of the Torah.
Audio
Shavuot
Shavuot is the culmination of the counting of the 49 days of the Omer. It marks the giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai. The Ten Commandments are read in synagogues on Shavuot just as they were in the desert on Mt. Sinai over 3,300 years ago.
Destruction and Renewal
Three weeks of the Jewish year -- Tammuz 17 to Av 9 -- are designated as a time of mourning over the destruction of the Holy Temple and the resultant galut (physical exile and spiritual displacement) in which we still find ourselves
The 15th of Av is the most mysterious day of the Jewish calendar: our Sages proclaim it one of the two greatest festivals of the year (the other being Yom Kippur!), yet they ordained no special observances or celebrations for it.
Learn more about the structure and the special days that mark the Jewish calendar.
Join Rabbi Schapiro for a Torah class on the special days that mark the Jewish calendar.
The New Moon and the Jewish Month Ahead
Travel around the Jewish calendar with this monthly series on the significance of the upcoming Jewish month. New classes every Rosh Chodesh.