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As Chassidism breathed new life into Judaism, Chassidic tunes infused Jewish song with a verve and spirit unknown to Judaism up to the revelation of the Baal Shem Tov. Chassidic song expresses the joy and yearnings of the soul, a reflection of these themes as explored in the teachings of Chassidim.

Hupp Cossack

Hupp Cossack

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Audio | 4:05
Nigun Simcha I
The birthplace of the Rebbe, of blessed memory, the Ukrainian city of Nikolayev was known for its famous Chabad Chassidim who were blessed with profound musical talents. A Nikolayever tune is noted by its deeply heartfelt expression and soulful yearnings.
Audio | 4:16
Essen Est Zich
Eating comes naturally; drinking and sleeping come naturally, but praying and studying Torah Seems to take much effort.... The Chassid, who invests sweat and tears in long hours of prayer and study, feels no satisfaction. Instead he yearns for the time when G-dliness and holiness will be as natural as eating and drinking, demanding no effort.
Audio | 4:34
Hupp Cossack!
This triumphant tune is associated with the a Chassidic Rebbe’s self-sacrifice in saving the life of a fellow Jew. The story: It once happened that a Jew who had rented an inn from the local landlord had fallen behind in his payments and was jailed. The landlord announced that on a particular day this Jew was to be dressed in a bear costume and to compete in a dance contest. The Shpoler Zeide put his life on the line and secretly took the place of this unfortunate Jew. This is the song to which they danced.
A tune expressing the longing of the soul to be closer to its Creator. Warm and moving, it is one of many Chabad tunes sung on Shabbat and holidays as the holiness of the day brings the Chassid to higher spiritual levels.
Audio | 4:04
Nigun Simcha II
The Chassid bursts forth in joyous song of hope and courage as he proceeds along the path to spiritual perfection.
Audio | 5:17
Keli Ata
You are my G-d and I will praise You, my G-d – and I will exalt You. (Psalms 118:28) King David’s words in Psalms take on new meaning as rendered in this tune composed by Rabbi Schneur Zalman, the first Chabad Rebbe. This Chabad classic was traditionally sung by the Chassidim at the conclusion of the Passover Seder.
Audio | 3:34
Nyeh Zhuritsi
Don't worry fellow travelers what will be, soon we will reach the – kretchma – (inn) and there we will have plenty to drink. This tune is 175 years old and was a favorite of the Chassidim who would sing it while traveling to Rabbi Dovber of Lubavitch, the second Chabad Rebbe. The song represents the Chassid who after studying Chassidism and becoming aware of what is expected from them in serving G-d, they wondered, "How will we ever reach this sublime goodness?" The answer: "We will travel to the Rebbe and there we will drink from the source."
Audio | 5:27
Ach Lailokim
Only to Hashem does my soul long Only He is my strength and redeemer. He raises me up, I will not stumble. (Psalms 62:6-7) This soulful tune serves as a bridge transporting the singer from his mundane weekly environment, to an elevated atmosphere of holiness. It melts the coldness of the heart and warms the soul with divine longing.
Audio | 3:19
Nigun Simcha III
In the spirit of "Serve G-d with joy" the Chassid celebrates his Judaism but is keenly aware that there is room for improvement.
Audio | 7:04
Haneiros Halolu
A colorful, lively Chanukah composition with symphonic overtones. It was first sung by the students of the Lubavitcher Yeshivah in the town of Lubavitch, Russia, nearly a century ago. Even to this day, Haneiros Halolu ignites the Chanukah spirit in thousands of homes around the world, as the family gathers around the flickering flames.
Audio | 4:50
Nigun Simcha IV
A joyous expression of the soul as it frees itself from the shackles that try to hinder its growth towards spiritual perfection.
My soul thirsts for You my flesh longs for You, In a desolate and weary land with no water. So, too, may I see You in holiness, To perceive Your strength and glory. (Psalms 63:2-3) Tracing its roots to the first Chabad Rebbe, this Chabad classic expresses the profound cry of the soul while in exile-striving to unite with the Infinite It ends with the wish that this intense yearning not be lost in the days of redemption when G-d's goodness and glory will be revealed to all.
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