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Tamar Maerim-Yunger describes her personal journey to Torah-true Judaism, and reflects on what covering her hair means to her.

Why I Cover My Hair

Why I Cover My Hair

The story of a journey to self

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Why I Cover My Hair: The story of a journey to self

Tamar Maerim-Yunger describes her personal journey to Torah-true Judaism, and reflects on what covering her hair means to her.
Hair Covering
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Rochel Chein for chabad.org November 17, 2016

To Emily Generally, divorced and widowed women cover their hair. This is because once a woman begins covering her hair, she has defined it as sensual and private. It would therefore be immodest to uncover it afterwards.

In certain cases, a divorced woman is permitted to uncover her hair. A woman in this situation should consult with an experienced rabbi about her specific circumstances. Reply

Emily Sun Toronto November 15, 2016

Should a divorced woman cover her hair? Hello,

My question is: should a divorced woman cover her hair?

Thank you. Reply

Tamar Yunger September 13, 2016

Back to the point Hi everyone, This is me! Thank you for all your comments. I know it was a long talk, frankly I had no idea it was even going online. This was an event to inspire women to connect with this mitzvah, but based on the discussion here it seems to me like the point of my talk was lost. I'm sure the halachot on hair covering is extensive and honestly I don't know more than that it should be covered. My talk was nothing to do with the halacha. I was asked to share why I (I would bold or underline I if I could here) cover my hair. It took me a lot of time after two years of covering to answer that question for myself as I mentioned in the video. The decision to, while considering halacha, was not the primary drive. Feeling close to Hashem was, and to be more conscious and aware on a daily basis of who I am as a Jewish woman and being conscious of what I bring or should be bringing of unique importance to this world. Reply

Anonymous New York October 18, 2015

Yocheved Reinstein was right. I am the anonymous person (on Dec. 9, 2013), who was upset about the wig not being modest. I was expressing my thoughts and it was not meant as a reprimand to anyone. I apologize to all whom I have offended or upset in any way. I do not know any of you personally so I hope I can have everyone's forgiveness. Thank you. Reply

Anonymous March 21, 2014

Lonf hair I thought your long hair had something to do with prayer and the angels? Reply

Bronya December 16, 2013

Indeed, we rejoice in and honour the human form, and we dignify the human form by covering it, Modestly, attractively, to be sure. But honouring it doesn't necessitate clothing ourself in some way that's less attractive. Most people are decidedly more attractive clothed than un. This doesn't mean that we 'dishonour' the human by covering it,.
And so with the hair of a married woman; she needs, by Jewish law, to cover it; she needn't, however, cover it with something that's less attractive. Reply

Anonymous December 12, 2013

a beautiful mitzvah, a difficult mitzvah, and a personal mitzvah In response to some of the comments: in order to be modest, there is no need to be unattractive or less attractive. The 2 are not mutually exclusive. On the surface, it seems like they would be, but a woman can be beautiful (in a wig) and still be modest. The purpose of the wig is not to look bad, or to look bad to other men. The purpose served by wearing a wig to cover ones hair, is to be unnatural, unlike yourself, in disguise (so to speak). A woman in a wig may be attractive to other men, but she will not be attracting him with her true, honest self. That will remain hidden. On a side note, I think that any way that a woman covers her hair, and to any degree is commendable. Reply

Anonymous London December 11, 2013

Inspirational What a wonderful, inspiring woman. Hearing this at a time when I am considering covering my hair in the future has been very informative and reassuring. Thank you for sharing this video. Reply

Yocheved Reinstein West Hempstead December 10, 2013

A beautiful gift of a shetl to a new bride I am happy that this woman covers her hair. If you want a wig that is plain or short, it's your choice. If you wear a scarf or a hat, that's nice. If you take pride in your modesty, it's allowed. But, I feel that using a public forum to anonymously reprimand this young bride is inappropriate. Reply

Anonymous Chicago North December 10, 2013

If one covers one's hair in modesty , perhaps the sheitle[?] should not be more attractive than one's real hair!
To truly appreciate the gift of human life we should rejoice in the human form , including natural hair , but still retain modesty by our dress and neat hairstyle .
Thank you and good wishes. Reply

Anonymous December 9, 2013

This is all very nice, but is covering her hair with that gorgeous wig really describing the mitzvah? I cover all my hair but I don't wear a wig because I cannot understand how it can be right and "meaningful" to cover your hair with such a fancy covering. This kind of wig is very far from modest. Reply

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