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This class covers the lives of several important Sephardic scholars of the medieval period (“Rishonim”), including Rabbeinu Yitzchak Alfasi and Ibn Ezra. The bulk of the class is spent on the life of Maimonides.

Maimonides and the Sephardic Rishonim

Maimonides and the Sephardic Rishonim

The Jews in Exile

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Maimonides and the Sephardic Rishonim : The Jews in Exile

This class covers the lives of several important Sephardic scholars of the medieval period (“Rishonim”), including Rabbeinu Yitzchak Alfasi and Ibn Ezra. The bulk of the class is spent on the life of Maimonides.
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Jewish History, Guide for the Perplexed, Iggeret Teiman, Sephardi, Ibn Ezra, Rif, Maimonides, Rishonim
Rabbi Mendel Dubov is the director of Chabad in Sussex County, NJ, and a member of faculty at the Rabbinical College of America in Morristown, NJ.
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Anonymous AQABA CITY June 9, 2013

connected space line Hi, nice subject you talk abut it and you have a very good presentation skills.

When I listen to your program I try hard to learn talking skills from you.

I want ask you a question abut the pictures behind you. I want to see
the pictures with a complete view -- I only can see a half of the pictures... Reply

Anonymous USA June 4, 2013

Maimonides and the Sephardic Rishonim This is to me one of the most interesting subjects because it involves my ancestors in the Sephardic community. I wish to learn as much as possible about them. If only I could have the source of the information you are lecturing on today Rabbi Dubov. Would it be too much to ask for a class paper? Or the source which I could study this subject? Reply

Tim Upham Tum Tum, WA June 3, 2013

Much More Far-Reaching Effects Actually, the Rishonim were practicing as far back as the 11th century C.E.. By today's standards, they are not considered Sephardim, but they were obviously influenced by the Sephardic Rishonim, included those in southern France and northwest Africa. Reply