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In this final class in a six-part series, we reach the culminating and most essential concept of Jewish belief—the belief in the perfection of this world. What is universal redemption? How does it come about? How is it connected to—and the fulfillment of—all of the other concepts we have learned about so far?

What Jews Believe: Redemption

What Jews Believe: Redemption

Jewish Theology, Lesson 6

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What Jews Believe: Redemption : Jewish Theology, Lesson 6

In this final class in a six-part series, we reach the culminating and most essential concept of Jewish belief—the belief in the perfection of this world. What is universal redemption? How does it come about? How is it connected to—and the fulfillment of—all of the other concepts we have learned about so far?
What Jews Believe 6
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Moshiach and the Future Redemption
Questions for Discussion
1. Why is the belief in Moshiach the fulfillment of the entire Torah? How does this idea tie together all of the ideas we have learned of so far in this series?
2 Why does Judaism describe a perfect world as one in which humanity’s only pursuit is to know G‑d?
3. How would you describe the process whereby this world becomes redeemed? Who does it? How?
4. Why must there be a figure known as Moshiach, and not just a utopian “messianic era”? What will his role be?

Further Reading:

Texts Cited
Maimonides, Laws of Kings 11:1
Maimonides, Laws of Kings 12:5
Essays
For Real
Between Fire and Ice
The Rebbe's Talks
Moshiach-Times: Future Lifestyles
Moshiach-Times: Seeing with New Eyes
By the Instructor
Belief in Moshiach
Rabbi Manis Friedman, a noted Chassidic philosopher, author and lecturer, is dean of Bais Chana Women's Institute of Jewish Studies.
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Rabbi Shmary Brownstein For Chabad.org August 24, 2015

To Rolando We will never attain perfect knowledge of G-d, because G-d is infinite and we are finite. We can go on forever deepening our understanding and appreciation of G-d. Maimonides writes that in the messianic time, we will comprehend the knowledge of our Creator "as much as is humanly possible."

The absence of sin doesn't remove the ability for a relationship, and on the contrary. If a couple are constantly struggling with not hurting each other, their relationship is not good. Certain things should not be an option in a good relationship. At that time our choices will be between various good options, choosing what the best and most appropriate way to serve G-d is. But we will continue to grow, to exercise free will, and to learn. Reply

Rolando VA August 18, 2015

If the world including nature and knowledge of G-d is already perfect(because of good no more option ) when Moshiach comes, what will he be teaching? Also, in absence of option how is relationship cemented? Do we become like the angels without free will?
Thank you. Reply

Marty Denver January 8, 2014

Redemption vs moshiach I never understood Rambam’s requirement in the belief of a moshiach. Why didn’t G-d specifically say,Believe in the coming of the moshiach? Isn’t it true that the concept of moshiach is only eluded too by a few prophets and ultimately the moshiach is based primarily on interpretation? The Torah doesn’t command us to believe in anything, does it? “I am the Lord thy G-d” is a statement, a davar, not a mitzvah or chok. Deut 18:18 G-d says He will send another prophet like Moses. Moses was our teacher, the law giver. Then wouldn’t the person like him do the same, be a teacher and interpret the law? In Deut 18:22 G-d tells us not to believe in prophets whose words are not fulfilled in their lifetime. What does that tell us regarding predictions about a moshiach? Deut 30:3-5 G-d says He will bring us back to Israel. Hasn’t He done so through Zionism? G-d works thru man and nature. That promise has been fulfilled, thank G-d, yet, no moshiach. Reply