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Many of us think of Torah as providing a code of law for religious observance but Torah also gives a detailed set of ethics for how we conduct ourselves in our everyday lives.

Jews, Judaism and Money

Jews, Judaism and Money

Understanding Jewish Business Ethics

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Jews, Judaism and Money: Understanding Jewish Business Ethics

Many of us think of Torah as providing a code of law for religious observance but Torah also gives a detailed set of ethics for how we conduct ourselves in our everyday lives.
Business Ethics
Mark Halpern is a financial advisor and radio talk show host in Toronto, Canada. He is widely recognized as the Top Living Benefits Advisor in Canada. He enjoys several professional designations including CFP (Certified Financial Planner), FMA (Financial Management Advisor) and an Honour’s Bachelor of Arts in Communications from York University.
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Anonymous June 3, 2012

The laughter was great, but... ...it could have been 20 minutes less of my time. Time is money. I'm not acctually serious about that. I loved the lesson, and appreciated it even more on the new site.

The norm would be five minute's of BUFFERING for three to five minute's of programs. It only buffered once for fortyfive seconds.

Thank you for both! Reply

Tim Upham Tum Tum, WA May 29, 2012

An Interesting Part Of History To Know About Jews have been stereotyped with being associated with money. But going back to the Middle Ages, there is an obvious reason for that stereotype. During the Middle Ages, you had to belong to a guild to be a part of any urban profession. In order to join a guild, you had to take a Christian oath. Since Jews could not do this, they formed their own guilds. it was against the Christian religion to perform usury or charging interest. So money lending became a Jewish profession. When areas such as Poland, Bohemia, and Hungary were trying to rebuild after the Mongol invasion, the monarchs of these areas issued royal edicts to invite foreigners from West -- Jews, Germans, and italians -- to help rebuild. Jews were welcomed in because their money lending provided capital for the rebuilding process. These large Jewish communities existed up until World War II. Explaining this component of Jewish history is very pivotal in part of explaining the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Reply

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