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When may information be shared? When must it be kept private? An overview of the primary sources in Torah, Talmud and Jewish Law governing the rules of confidentiality and privacy.

Confidentiality and Privacy

Confidentiality and Privacy

The Torah View on Privileged Information

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Confidentiality and Privacy: The Torah View on Privileged Information

When may information be shared? When must it be kept private? An overview of the primary sources in Torah, Talmud and Jewish Law governing the rules of confidentiality and privacy.
Privacy; Confidentiality, Law; Jurisprudence
Rabbi Moshe Krasnanski is director of Chabad of the Town and Dean of the Canadian Institute of Contemporary Jewish Law and Ethics.
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Anonymous Oslo, Norway July 18, 2012

Thank you for this information, to me all of this sounds good and true and challenges me to be a better person, that is; generally working towards more, not less privecy.

About the risk of harming one self by warning others in certain situations, when harm can be done to them,would this be a consideration: I should be willing to carry some loss,( some harm relativly speaking), if the benefit for the others is much bigger (relativly speaking), but no other should jugde me wrong if I should not warn in such a situation, except if I do not warn about life threatning situations. Please correct me if my way of thinking is wrong. Reply

Paloni Jerusalem May 14, 2012

Celebrities Could not revealing certain private information of celebrities be considered constructive? For instance, be revealing that celebrity X is a "fill in the blank with negative character trait" you will discourage easily influenced people from admiring or worse idolizing these people - hopefully. Reply