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Faith is the ability to accept that painful experiences can actually be a form of goodness that is beyond the mind's ability to grasp.

Is Suffering a Blessing in Disguise?

Is Suffering a Blessing in Disguise?

The Power of Faith to Face Adversity

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Rabbi Ben-Tzion Krasnianski is director of Chabad Lubavitch of the Upper East Side in Manhattan
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Discussion (3)
November 20, 2012
response to Avraham's question
Dear Avraham,
Whoever tells you that they could explain pain and suffering is a fool. We are not looking for explanations the best answer is to remove the question. Nothing less then the coming of Moshiach and an end to pain and suffering could possibly satisfy us. Besides all the explanations are regarding our own suffering not G-d forbid for someone else's pain especially that of a baby! Even regarding our own pain we are commanded to pray to storm heaven and earth to avert the terrible decree because we have a deep inner sense that something is amiss, in a perfect world in G-d's world there should be no pain and suffering period.
The Alter Rebbe is addressing the initiate who is up to chapter 26 in Tanya! explaing the inexplicable mystery of the suffering person paradoxically feeling a greater intimacy with G-d then the one who's obviously blessed.

May you only know from joy!
Ben Tzion Krasnianski
Ben Tzion Krasnianski
July 2, 2012
Not always a "blessing in disguise"
This argument is not applicable to that baby who suffers from an illness immediately after birth and who goes on to die soon afterwards. For that person, no amount of "spin" about the "blessing in disguise" will have helped him/her to understand and cope with the agonizing suffering he/she endured. Your argument is only helpful to those who have the intellectual maturity to reflect upon the ideas you convey. It is not applicable (and therefore fatuous) for those who either lack the capacity to understand or have no opportunity (time) to reflect. Further, waiting for Moshiach is of no comfort for that baby, so do not present that argument!
No Rabbi, sage or teacher has ever been able to provide a satisfactory counter-argument.
Avraham
January 15, 2012
Is Suffering a Blessing in Disguise
Thank you for this lecture. It was very thought provoking, I really enjoyed listening to your comments. I have had shoulder replacemtn surgery and am not recovering as had hoped so this was very helpful to me.
Laurie Julian
Winnetka, CA/USA
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