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What is it that will come to an end in the future redemption, and what will existence be like?

Moshiach and the End of Days

Moshiach and the End of Days

The End of What?

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Rabbi Manis Friedman, a noted Chassidic philosopher, author and lecturer, is dean of Bais Chana Women's Institute of Jewish Studies.
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Anonymous April 25, 2014

At the time of end of days. I listened to the point where when women are pregnant they will deliver same day. Well that would be nice. Though it was also said there would be no age, only G-D knows the end results. If there is not any time then how do babies grow etc. So this individuals thought of end of days does not make since. Instead of speculating of end of days. I would think praying and being free of sin and making sure I am clean. So at the end of days I pray G-D will say I have been good. Those who believe must repent, so to be able to be with G-D. Pray and listen. Also I would like to see one pray day for the whole world, one day and time that we all pray Israel start building the Temple. Am I the only one wondering why this has not been done, The one thing G-D asked us to do and how not bee done. What is wrong with this picture Israel? Reply

molly lyda April 24, 2014

If people don't age then why would anyone conceive and have a baby. How will the baby grow up (so to speak) if we won't age. Reply

Lynn Magnuson New Orleans, LA. April 21, 2014

This is a beautiful description of the Messianic era. I am in the process of converting into Judaism which isn't yet complete, but I'm finding this is not really a "conversion" but more a process of coming to the place I should have been all along. Coming home. Christians teach a very different version of this, but the Rabbi's version seems much more sensible and to the point. My reasons for conversion have to do with the nature of God. The Bible (both Hebrew and Christian scriptures) teach ONE GOD, yet the churches have divided Creator into three, and even given him a son. Either God is the same from beginning to end of the scriptures, and of time ... or something is very off. I prefer to think the former is the case rather than the latter. My questions in this regard is why I'm studying Judaism now. It is a beautiful and compassionate faith and I look forward to being a part of it. Reply

James Oliver Lake Country ,B.C. Canada April 20, 2014

I appreciate Rabbi Friedman's commentary . I look forward as G-d's heavenly clock is pointing to this event , with great anticipation which will end in ultimate relief and Joy ! I love just Be-ing me . I have had to learn to allow G-d the same Grace He has extended to me back to Him , and not be so demanding and just take responsibility for my actions and choices and be patient ! . He is running the show and not me ! I am sure glad of that ! Reply

Sr Jeff Eger Mesa, Az via chabadofscottsdale.org April 20, 2014

Rabbi Freidman is very wiseI heard him speak in Scottsdale and Phoenix.He has wisdom and intuition which is necessary for trust and faith,from my experience with performers.

I want to challenge him to answer my question,. was Moses A thinker or feeler when he got the message from G-d? He,didn't ask what is in it for me,and did lead his and G-d's children out of Egypt.He didn't even get his just reward to see the promised land he lead the Jews to find and settle.Thinker can't total feel Hashem because they squash feel,intuition,trust and belief,from my observation. Reply

Richard Florida April 20, 2014

I don't even think about the end of days. Instead, I do what I can each day to help others and myself. I don't worry myself with too much study and legalism but look to do good.
Over the years, I have become very concerned with orthodox types in all religions that pay scant attention to a human at their side in need. These religious ones are so busy rushing about mumbling to themselves that they don't seem to notice G-d's creation.
Reply

Tehila B. D. April 20, 2014

It was not His kindness that motivated Him to take us out of Egypt, (...) it was Him.
It was not His judgement, He did not sit there thinking:"ok you suffer enough (...) it was not justice. And it was not compation: "poor people look at them so miserable lets go and help them up"
“I have seen the affliction of my people who are in Egypt, and have heard their cry because of their taskmasters; I know their sufferings, 8 and I have come down to deliver them out of the hand of the Egyptians, " Exodus 3:7-8
"9 And now, behold, the cry of the people of Israel has come to me, and I have seen the oppression with which the Egyptians oppress them." Exodus 37:9

I believe that in a relationship there is truth if I know what the other is expecting of me and what I am expecting from the other. With G-d we know He is expecting of us to keep His commandments (the first ones that he gave, the 10th). We keep them and we can expect to be His people in return: this is a relationship base on truth and love Reply

Anonymous Chesapeake April 20, 2014

insightful! i still take Solomons illustration more literally, that the true mother had unconditional love even if she had no pleasure in upbringing her child, but the phoney only lusted to be a mother and would have all or nothing, if the child's life were to be at stake. the Fiddler on the Roof scene shows a mother's love when a daughter choses to disobey Reply

Rabbi Yafu NJ April 20, 2014

After Having researched myself many of the facinating topics of the Messianic Era both of the questions you asked are quite complicated, and are argued extensively by Rabbis of medieval times, to put it briefly:
1) According to most Rabbis there will be two totally separate time periods in the Messianic Era; in the first period the kind messiah would have arrived but life will remain the same, people will die at normal ages, world nature will remain the same etc. There are different opinions regarding how long this period will last among them are 20, 40, 100 years.
2) After the above mentioned period a new period will dawn with many miracles death and evil will cease to exist, Chasidic philosophy generally accepts the opinion (of Nachmanides) that we will remain with our physical body (in the contrary to the view of Maimonides that it is merely a soul life).
Now regarding the first period there are different opinions cited in various Midrashim, that the years of ones life will change. Reply

Anonymous Mesa, Az via chabadofscottsdale.org April 19, 2014

We are afraid of truth because we think or overanalyze Hashem and not feel him soulfully with trust and faith. When you think -you doubt-worry fear-go into inefficient performance.Why do Chabad Rabbis fear seeing the big picture to see the world in slow time-trust it-feel it(intuition-which many chabbad rabbis fear or dislike this word)-trust it and do it to G-d like potential.Feel and trust and faith are interconnected in the higher spirit. It does not come from overanalyzing him because there is no trust in the think cycle by seeing the small tight picture. Reply

Anonymous Brooklyn, NY April 18, 2014

He said "Not that there will be only one G-d", meaning: not that now there is, G-d forbid, more than one G-d, and that then there will be only one but...(as he goes on to say) Reply

Anonymous April 17, 2014

This makes me ask why do we need a Moshiach, or why Creator thinks we need one? Reply

zeynep November 2, 2013

Because frankly, when one starts to experience glimpses of the "JUST YOU" feeling towards the ONE, and resolves and dedicates oneself to do everything it takes to make this inexplicable feeling of unconditionality permanent (and that is uniquely Jewish Work!), this makes one even more acutely aware of the human imperfection in revealing G-dliness within the context of human marriage. Knowing that it can be infinitely better, it becomes impossible to commit to or stay in it.

If the term 'marriage' in its truest and deepest sense really can only apply to the Jew's marriage to his/her G-d (which I believe to be true), then how does this affect one's perspective of human marriage?

The tikkun involved here is perhaps not to try to uphold an unrealistic, even impossible ideal of 'perfect human marriage', but start to meditate upon the justification of its existence as we know it today. Perhaps it was merely meant for biological procreation after all. Then when no biology, no marriage... Reply

David Cohen Cedar Park, TX August 3, 2013

This puts a whole new meaning to the "end of days" for me, and seeking the truth and oneness. Reply

Linda June 17, 2013

Why did the rabbi say there will not be only one G-d? At 36:24 on the tape
This was amazing.. We are so off the mark with the English versions of the bible and what is being taught in the Christian churches. But G-d will show us all soon. Reply

Hannah Los Angeles, California April 3, 2012

I was always scared to think about what will happen in the end of days,until I heard Rabbi Manis Friedman give this lecture!
I want to thank you very much! Reply

Eva Amzallag San Antonio , Texas December 5, 2011

There is nothing more beautiful than the truth.

Thank you..... Reply

Jacques Asseo Viera, Florida/USA June 21, 2011

When is Moshiach supposed to come? How long must we endure sufferings before he appears? After all these past centuries of wars and disturbances in this world of ours. We could have known Peace if Moshiach would have come earlier. Where is G-D in that respect of helping His own Creation? Questions can be asked especially after what happens to His own People! Reply

james krieger denison, tx. June 28, 2011

keep them coming, very very good, G-D bless you. Reply

Annette Brooklyn, NY June 25, 2011

I've been listening to the two discourses by Rabbi Manis Friedman on Moshiach.

In the first one the Rabbi spoke about people will live for 220 years. In the second one the Rabbi said, "People will live forever."

Can you clarify these questions?

Third, the Rabbi spoke about the world order being the same. Does that mean that news stations will be around. For example, Moshiach will be on CNN to tell the world who he/she is? I don't mean to be funny. Reply