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The key to raising children is not to “raise” them, but to include them in your own life, and to live your own life in a way that is worth emulating.

How to Raise a Child

How to Raise a Child

Will our children want to follow in our footsteps?

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How to Raise a Child: Will our children want to follow in our footsteps?

The key to raising children is not to “raise” them, but to include them in your own life, and to live your own life in a way that is worth emulating.
Parenting; Parenthood, Tribalism
Rabbi Manis Friedman, a noted Chassidic philosopher, author and lecturer, is dean of Bais Chana Women's Institute of Jewish Studies.
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Josef New England January 12, 2015

Public School We have been in a financial crunch, so at the beginning of the school year we have sent our children Josh 8, and Gracie 7, and after 1 month and half we withdraw them. Josh was so bored because they only read absurd fantasy story books and his efficiency in math begin to decline, on the other hand Gracie was bullied, one of her peers a girl told her that she is going to cut her head off, that was enough for us. Public Schools are not an option for us anymore. Now we get back to homeschooling and they spend good quality time reading Jewish stories that encourage them in their Jewishness. Hashem always provides! Reply

Anonymous Boca Raton, Fl July 19, 2014

Great Shiur Thank you Rabbi for such an insightful message. Reply

David Logan Bellingham, Wa/USA August 23, 2011

Love Love the "schools messed everything up" comment! Reply

Eli LA, CA via chabadlosfeliz.org March 12, 2011

@ Rivkah Schneirson Rivkah,

Just be glad and proud your children remain Jewish. It could be worse. Way worse. As in, what my 86 year old mother--as well as my 2 siblings & myself--suffer, at the notion that our brother entered into Xtianity around age 23 (and he's 56 now). He's a lovely person, and we love him dearly, but his swerve off the drench was waaaaaaaay off, and he never took the high road back.

Incidentally, he's now victimized by a disease that is permanent and contributes to early death. So we've all but given up he'll ever return.

Your children and grandchildren are Jewish, and they love you. That's all that matters. Reply

Anonymous March 10, 2011

insightful I always enjoy listening or watching Rabbi Manis freedmans lectures.
They are always insightful and so simple and logical!! Reply

Homeschooling Imma Boston February 23, 2011

Jewish Homeschooling A growing number of families have discovered the advantage of Torah-centered homeschooling: the children live and breathe Judaism in a natural way, spend a lot of time with their parents and siblings, and have time to pursue chesed activities. Children get to see more of the parent's life and parent's have more opportunities to provide models of behavior and learning. Reply

rivkah schneirson Lakewood, NJ February 17, 2011

For One Who Returns to Judaism What about a Baalas Teshuva? (one who returns to Judaism) I became a baalas tshuvah at 52.
My children are secular, and I live a full orthodox life. Understandably, this has created a separation, but we try to bridge the gap as welll as we can, as we try to maintain harmony at home. Two of my grandchildren go to a conservative Jewish day schools and the other two grandchildren go to Sunday school for two hours/wk. When I travel to see them, the Sunday school parents have a Rabbi come to kosher the kitchen in the guest house for us. They see us observe Shabbos and Yom Tov, and although my children didn't see me observant when they were little, I try my best to be a new role model. With the help of G-d and my tears and prayers, I hope they become observant someday.. Reply

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