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This is a melody in two sections, expressing the profound longing of the soul for its Creator

Anim Zmiros

Anim Zmiros

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Anim Zmiros

This is a melody in two sections, expressing the profound longing of the soul for its Creator
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Lyrics:

Transliteration:

A-nim z-mi-rois vi-shi-rim e-roig, ki ei-le-chah naf-shi sa-a-roig. Naf-shi cham-dah bi-tzeil ya-de-chah la-da-as kol roz soi-de-chah.

Translation:

I sing hymns and compose songs because my soul long for you. My soul desires Your shelter to know all Your ways.

Shabbat liturgy.

Musical Notes


This is a melody in two sections, expressing the profound longing of the Jewish soul for its Creator. "I sing hymns and compose songs because my soul long for you. My soul desires Your shelter to know all Your ways." The succeeding verses may also be sung with the same melody.

It was customary for the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, of righteous memory, to teach a new melody each year on the holiday of Simchat Torah after the Hakofot or to reintroduce and old melody. The disciples would learn the new melody and sing it at future Chassidic gatherings. This melody of was taught by the Rebbe on Simchat Torah 1961, when he also explained its inner meaning.



Vocalists
Cantor Moshe Teleshevsky
Moshe Herson
Samson Charitonov
Music notes courtesy of Kehot Publication Society and Chabad Melodies by Eli Lipsker and Velvel Pasternak.
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6 Comments
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Rabbi Shmary Brownstein For Chabad.org November 27, 2014

Re: Thank you Rebbe for sharing You can find the explanation for this song and for the other songs which the Rebbe taught at this location: Reply

Anonymous Pittsburgh November 16, 2014

Thank you Rebbe for sharing A beautiful melody to a beautiful poem, where "beautiful" is probably the wrong word in both cases.

Has the Rebbe's explanation of the meaning been transcribed or recorded somewhere? Reply

Eliezer Zalmanov for Chabad.org June 29, 2014

To BMG It isn't a "Chabad prayer." It is a Chabad tune appended to a poem which was written at some point in the 12th century, and which some (but not Chabad) insert at the end of the Shabbat service. Reply

BMG Maryland June 27, 2014

Nusach Ari If this is a Chabad prayer why is it not in the siddur? Reply

Mendy cincinnati June 9, 2013

where is the story Why don't you post the story behind the niggun? Reply

Noah Jerusalem, Israel June 11, 2011

Story behing the niggun B'H

I've heard different versions of the story behind this niggun and would love to know if someone has a link or source for the original.

Tizku L'mitzvot. Reply

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