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A musical meditation on what the world will be like in the times of Moshiach when everyday will be a day of Sabbath-like rest.

Bringing Shabbat Into the Week

Bringing Shabbat Into the Week

Wisdom at the Western Wall

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Bringing Shabbat Into the Week: Wisdom at the Western Wall

A musical meditation on what the world will be like in the times of Moshiach when everyday will be a day of Sabbath-like rest.
Music; Song, Moshiach and the Future Redemption, Motzoei Shabbat
Gutman Locks—also affectionately known as “Guru Gil”—has been a fixture in the Old City of Jerusalem for two decades. He is the author of several books and musical tapes. His website is www.thereisone.com.
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Gutman Jerusalem October 9, 2013

Anonymous who is looking for a congregation Anonymous above who is looking for a congregation-if there is no fitting congregation in your town, look on the internet-there are many Jews who keep contact and learn Torah only via the internet-Jews from all over the world learning and connecting right from their own houses. Jews are a blessed people. Be well Reply

Dr. Elyas Fraenkel Isaacs, PhD,DPH,DDiv. New York September 1, 2013

The Hammer Dulcimer The hammered dulcimer is a stringed instrument with strings stretched over a sounding board. Often, the hammered dulcimer is set on a stand, angled, before the musician holding small mallet hammers in each hand strikes the strings (cf. Appalachia). The Graeco-Roman dulcimer derives from the Latin dulcis (sweet) and the Greek melos (song). The dulcimer, where strings are beaten with small hammers, originated from the psaltery, which uses plucked strings.

Various hammered dulcimers are traditionally played in India, Iran, Southwest Asia, China, and parts of Southeast Asia, Central Europe (Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Poland, Czech Republic), Switzerland, Austria and Bavaria as well as in in Great Britain, Wales, East Anglia, Northumbria, and the U.S.
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Gutman Jerusalem January 17, 2013

answer to anonymous Surely there is a Chabad community in your area. Better yet, since you are a Jew, come live in Israel. It's great here. Be well, Gutman Reply

Anonymous December 13, 2012

Bringing Shabbat Into The Week As I look into this video and see the Rabbi playing this instrument and listening to the music. I meditate into his words. "When Moshiach comes." I ask myself this question: Hashem, blessed be He, this question: Why was my family scattered in the past. Why was I born into this family which seems to be cursed? I love Hashem so much, blessed be He. I also love my Jewish brethren. But it seems to me that I will never be amongst the congregation of my people. How sad. I have tried to contact most Jewish organizations without success. I am giving up. But no matter what, I am still a Jewess. I have a Jewish soul. Hashem have confirmed this to me. He said once. Your Gael Mael is near. Blessed be He. Maybe some day, if I try hard enough... No one understand. No one believes me. May Hashem's, will be done. Reply

Gutman Locks Jerusalem, Israel December 25, 2011

What Instrument? I designed and hand-crafted that musical instrument and "invented" the tuning, too. You can hear more of it at my website. There is a CD, too. Also listen to the music on the meditation video. Reply

Anonymous Ottawa, ON -- Ontario December 24, 2011

Instrument What instrument is he playing? Reply

David Ben Moshe Chicago, US February 25, 2011

Thank you! This is so beautiful!!! Reply