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Why Torah must be comprised of both a Written Law and an accompanying Oral Tradition.

The Source and Meaning of the Oral Torah

The Source and Meaning of the Oral Torah

13 Principles of Torah Elucidation - Lesson 1

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The Source and Meaning of the Oral Torah: 13 Principles of Torah Elucidation - Lesson 1

Why Torah must be comprised of both a Written Law and an accompanying Oral Tradition.
The Source and Meaning of the Oral Torah
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Rabbi Immanuel Schochet (1935–2013) wrote and lectured extensively on the history and philosophy of Chassidism and topical themes of Jewish thought and ethics. He was a renowned authority on Jewish philosophy and mysticism. He was rabbi of Cong. Beth Joseph, and professor of Philosophy at Humber College, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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Avraham Lehr Dix Hills August 1, 2013

I miss you so much Rabbi Immanuel Schochet! Every one of your talks are always fascinating and most enjoyable to listen to. May Moshiach come now so we can see you and listen to you again in actuality! Reply

Dr. John Nocera Calhoun, LA July 10, 2012

Oral law Rabbi, Your teaching is crystal clear, and has opened my eyes to why an oral torah is not a myth, but a fact! If you can convince me (an Assemblies of God pastor), you can certainly convince any religious skeptic. Great lectures.

G-d bless you. Reply

Anonymous Lawrence, NY October 11, 2011

Accuracy of the Torah Disagreements on the Torah are virtually nonexistent, certainly in comparison to the Christian doctrines. The "New Testament" is nearly 1700 younger than the Torah, and despite never going into exile like the Jewish people, and their ability to maintain centrality of the text, the Vatican, to ensure its accuracy, there are more than 30,000 different readings on 150 original Greek manuscripts of the Gospel of Luke (The Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible). Meanwhile, 3300 years after its transmission, the Torah miraculously has only 9 spelling variants, which serve to have absolutely no effect on the meaning, for example, the words color and colour. This unequivocally shows that if one accepts the written Torah, like the story of Hillel, one must simultaneously accept the oral Torah as a fundamental part of tradition including concepts, laws, and instructions for reading the written Torah itself. Reply

Moss Posner, M.D. Fresno, CA August 28, 2010

Validity of the Oral Torah The Oral Torah was given to Moses on Mt. Sinai. It was just that--passed down orally from generation to generation. When in the 1st century it became apparent that this teaching could be lost (with Diaspora) it was committed to written form. That aspect of torah (Mishna,) together with the sages commentary on it (Gemara) constitute the Talmud. Reply

Rabbi Schochet August 18, 2010

re inspiration Subject to the rules of interpretation and the authoritativeness of the author's view, when the rules are followed, the rabbis' conclusion is fully authoritative to the point of BIBLICAL sanction by virtue of the Biblical laws to abide by the rabbis' decision and the prohibition not to veer there from. Metaphysically you can call it inspired, though it follows strict logical reasoning. Reply

Anonymous Knoxville August 17, 2010

Inspiration Is the oral Torah ever referred to by the ancient "writers" as inspired or did they see themselves as interprative writers? Or is there a difference in inspiration of the oral Torah and the written Torah. If so, and it seems that there is, where does the authority come from for following oral Torah as inspired? Reply

Edwin Axton Stanwood, WA... August 17, 2010

Torah Awesome dissertation, Now I understand the difference. THANK YOU Rabbi! Reply

Luther Nashman bronx, ny USA August 15, 2010

Lesson # 1 Oral torah Well presented and very informative lesson. Finally a straightforward explanation of the oral torah. Reply

Alethea Margate, FL August 14, 2010

Forehead and Right Hand When it is written "upon the forehead" - does it mean your brain? - as a example when you say a Rebbe has righteous memory - it is written there by our Father. And right hand - you are doing G-d's work? You are doing what G-d has commanded us to do? Reply

Anonymous Millington, MI August 12, 2010

13 Principles of Torah Elucidation Thank you Rabbi! Visual aids helped me understand. Please continue the Outstanding job! Looking forward for the next lesson. Reply

Anonymous Albuquerque, NM August 12, 2010

13 Principles of Torah Elucidation Great Lecture! Really shows the validity of the oral tradition. Reply

Michael Harshberger Logan, Utah August 11, 2010

presentation Outstanding! Thank you! Reply