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Rabbi Tzvi Freeman presents tried and proven ideas, gimmicks, props and shtick to bring your Seder alive.

How to Make a Wild and Wonderful Passover Seder

How to Make a Wild and Wonderful Passover Seder

A Practical Guide

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Wild and Wonderful Passover Seder: A Practical Guide

Rabbi Tzvi Freeman presents tried and proven ideas, gimmicks, props and shtick to bring your Seder alive.
Seder, Haggadah

Click on the following links for the accompanying class resource material:
Pesach Songs; The Seder; The Haggadah

Rabbi Tzvi Freeman, a senior editor at Chabad.org, also heads our Ask The Rabbi team. He is the author of Bringing Heaven Down to Earth. To subscribe to regular updates of Rabbi Freeman's writing, visit Freeman Files subscription. FaceBook @RabbiTzviFreeman Periscope @Tzvi_Freeman .
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Pam Machefsky Mitzpe Ramon, Israel March 21, 2013

Wild and wonderful seder Thanks for these creative ideas--so important to bring the joy of Judaism to our grandchildren. Making happy memories while keeping traditions! Reply

Jack Midland Park February 27, 2013

Seders for children I ran seders for over 30 years and considered every child important. We had about 10 of them of various ages. I would call upon them in age order, the youngest being first.
This included babies in carriages. They were ask to recite the four questions (feer cashes ) They asked them in many languages making them feel connected to Jewish children all of the world.
Now these children are grown up and have children of their own and running their own seders. L'dor v'dor. Reply

Hadassah North Miami Beach, FL April 16, 2012

inspirational I was listening to this video while cooking and preparing for our Pesach seder. My grandchildren were coming for the first time and I decided to incorporate the general idea with our own 'tweak'. Each child was given a role with a short paragraph to read. They got to dress up and make a guest appearance at spaced out times throughout the seder. We had Sarah Emainu, Miriam, Yocheved, young Moshe on Paroah's lap (stealing the crown) and Paroah in pajamas looking for Moshe! They each enjoyed their parts and looked forward to seeing each other perform. To add to the excitement, we didn't tell the rest of the grown ups what was going on beforehand. Everyone said it was their best seder ever. Reply

ruth housman marshfield hills, MA March 30, 2012

Seder and Siddur are related words.

I see matzoh as a burnt manuscript. There was a famous burnt manuscript, a story related by a scholar in Israel, Ouaknin, who wrote a seminal book on our aleph bet, a book I cherish and also gave to a friend, who is a wonderful calligrapher.

The reason for burnt as in manuscript has many reverbs to "our story" even as our books were burned, even as Holy Fire is to burn, as in what is not consumed. We survive, and our thirst for knowledge is what is all consuming, and it is for a reason we're known as The People of The BOOK, and the BOOK that is very all consuming, has to be TORAH itself.

Hag Sameach. Let it ring true. Next YEAR in Jerusalem. Reply

Rabbi Laricof Meah She'arim, Isreal March 29, 2012

Amazing When I watched this video I was amazed the information in the lecture is really good to understand and has many great information. I look forward to watch more shiurim by Rabbi Tzvi Freeman Reply

zoo kid bulgaria March 28, 2012

OMG! this clip is awesome! where can i get more of rabbi freeman's stuff? i really need more to survive in this world. Reply

thecoolkid zimbabwe March 28, 2012

TOTALLY RAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! this vid is totally rad! it rocks! i love rabbi freeman! Reply

ruth housman@mac.com marshfield hills, MA April 21, 2011

Wild and Wonderful What is wild and wonderful, is not just the Seder but the meaning within, because we spent time in the desert, in Egypt in slavery, and beyond, before we entered the Promised Land, and so we learned about desert and what it means to feel, deserted, and have, throughout history, and yet we were never deserted.

I was at a concert recently and noticed the peace symbols above me, in that room, House of Blues, and there was the Star of David. Suddenly it became clear to me, that the shape of our star is deeply reminiscent of a turtle. Look at this and ponder, and you will also perceive the Diamond within, and two hour glasses on the side, as for sands of time. But the overall shape, is like a turtle, reminiscent of The Sign of the Turtle, about the turtle dove and a song of peace.

The turtle carries its house on its back, and throughout history we are known or were, as a wandering peoples, seeking homeland.

The mandate is clear: sanctify the environment. Work to change the world! Reply

levy via chabadantwerp.org April 18, 2011

good guy Thanks. I am listening to you from Israel. Reply

Yoel Leib June 8, 2010

Excellent ideas, it reminds me of my childhood sedarim. My uncle was always the one who told the story, and he had these tins in the shape of mummies that he'd keep pencils and art supplies in, so whenever he got to the word `pharaoh` he would hold it up to show off to everyone.

The other fun thing I remember, was with the matzah, when it broke we'd try to figure out what state or country it looked like. Reply

very satisfied customer tzfat, israel April 8, 2010

seder success dear rabbi freeman- thank you soooo much!!! we are a chabad family in israel and i am a bubbe, thank G-d. i listened to this class a few days before pesach and i ran to the toy stores to look for props. i found the most adorable rubber mommy frog and her babies, animal hand puppets and necklaces and bracelets, and something for the baby boy. i didn't tell my daughter and i surprised them when the kids started getting restless. periodically pulling out additional props and surprises. it was fantastic. a real tool to engage the kids interest and really speak to them on their level about what was going on in the seder, what it means to them, etc. it also brought delight to the adults thru the kids excitement. thank you so very much for sharing this great great idea. we are one family that really benefited from your sharing!!! may you be blessed to continue to inspire. we had a terrific seder experience. Reply

Chaim Hadley, MA March 24, 2010

Wow, thank you. This is excellent. Reply

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