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Leaving the upper world while holding on tight.

Amidah: Shemoneh Esrei

Amidah: Shemoneh Esrei

Part 4: The Exit

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Amidah: Shemoneh Esrei 4: Part 4: The Exit

Leaving the upper world while holding on tight.
Amidah
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Meditation
Rabbi Tzvi Freeman, a senior editor at Chabad.org, also heads our Ask The Rabbi team. He is the author of Bringing Heaven Down to Earth. To subscribe to regular updates of Rabbi Freeman's writing, visit Freeman Files subscription. FaceBook @RabbiTzviFreeman Periscope @Tzvi_Freeman .
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Anne-Marie Dheere Cyprus November 8, 2014

A wonderful series into "The Shemoneh Esrei,", an awesome insight to understand the meaning of our prayer to our HaShem, while standing in His presence asking for forgiveness, abundance, peace and gratitude for all He has given us and asking Him for the building of the Holy Temple. Thank you Rabbi Freeman. Reply

Anonymous Long Island, NY February 16, 2014

So grateful to you Rabbi Freeman I have been avoiding meditating for too many years. I have anxiety issues. I am not one who can sit and repeat a phrase over and over, look at a candle or let my thoughts "be," there are some time too many. I also yearned for it to be Jewish. I thankfully pray, but I can't trust the answers because of so many different voices, inner and outer (other people). This was the piece that was missing for me. Your voice is so calm. I listen throughout the day and especially before sleeping. I also have major trust issues, longing to know what H-shem's will is. You have given me the vehicle to finally, hopefully have clarity, trust and calm. Now I will know how to do lulav and esrog!! What a kind, compassionate, wise, humble, sensitive, honest soul you are!!! So grateful to see a person live, shine and teach with these qualities. Toda Rabba!! Reply

Anonymous Grayslake, IL March 22, 2010

This was wonderful Thank you for bringing more meaning to my prayer. This was incredible and just what I needed to fully understand what I am doing while praying. Reply

Anonymous December 22, 2009

finally ! It took a couple weeks to get back to parts 2, 3, 4 of this prayer. As usual you make a prayer, this time Shemoneh Esrei, wondrous and comprehensible. It's a story ! Who wudda thought ?! Everyone loves a good sequential story. But you have woven it into the holy serene reverent level on which it is intended to be.
While it is beyond my ken as a meditation, it is going to be more profound than what i was accustomed to.
Your take allows one to look forward to each opportunity to repeat this private and precious timeout with G-d. And v'imru amen, the angels !
Personally i have made it a habit to only apply the words awe and awesome to G-d. Like your lessons on Modeh Ani, the Shema, Kaddish >Amen Yehey Shmey Rabba, the Shemoneh Esrei is all about G-d because we make it thus via our kavanaha and emunah.
Once again, thank you for teaching/storytelling that resonates resoundingly. Reply

Michal November 16, 2009

Meditation on Shemonah essreh I am not able to express my joy, that I could listen to the words you said about the Amida.
It was the first prayer I learned (still with my husband z"l's help) to say in Hebrew, and at the same time understanding each word.
I did not know much about it, but felt, that it was perfect, full of beauty. But until today,
there were many sentences collected, and I did not see a connection between them.
I even wondered, what our forefathers had
to do with it...And now I see, that there is a connection between the blessings, and there is a reason why we pray in this way. There is a deep sense, how one blessing follows the other, and that it would not be whole, if we left one out.
I am not only happy to have heard this from you, Rabbi Freeman, I am deeply moved and impressed, and from now on I will have all that in mind, when I pray it.
I thank you so much for teaching us!
From now on I will love the Amida even more. So much sense in everything, and really perfect beauty. - Reply

In order to give one’s words wings with which they may fly, we endeavor to infuse them with meditative intentions. Learning to inspire prayer with meditation greatly enhances the experience and imbues it with enhanced meaning and reach. This series offers guided meditations appropriate to everyday prayer.
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