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Discussions of laws related to daily Jewish living as sourced in the weekly Torah readings.

Parshah Halachah

Parshah Halachah

Halachic Issues Culled from the Parshah

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Parshat Bereishit
The first mitzvah in the Torah is "to be fruitful and multiply." As the verse in Genesis states: "And G‑d said to them, 'Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth...'" This mitzvah is considered a "great mitzvah" and in some cases even overrides certain other laws.
Parshat Noach
The Torah commands every person to ensure his animals are fed—and in the proper time. Actually, we are commanded to feed our animals before we eat ourselves. “And I will give grass in your field for your livestock”—and only thereafter “and you will eat and be sated.”
Parshat Lech Lecha
Our sages go as far as to say that if not for this mitzvah, G‑d would not have created the heavens and earth; it is the greatest of the positive mitzvot; and considered the equivalent to all of the mitzvot of the Torah combined!
Parshat Vayeira
The proper date and time, the laws of a Shabbat brit, a list of honorees, and a to-do preparatory list.
Parshat Chayei Sarah
The essence of prayer is kavanah—focus and concentration. In order to achieve proper kavanah, it is important to pray in the proper place and with as few distractions as possible. This article focuses on the appropriate location for prayer, as well as the immersion in a mikvah.
Parshat Toldot
It seems that pressing need overrides the general prohibition against deception. This article will explore the importance of truth and the permissibility of deception under extenuating circumstances.
Parshat Vayeitzei
It is said that in the merit of praying with a minyan, one will make a living more easily and be blessed with the fruits of his labor. In fact, even if praying with a minyan causes one financial loss, G-d will repay him by granting him extra success...
Parshat Vayishlach
Calculating the bar mitzvah date, the privileges and responsibilities of the bar mitzvah boy, and laws and customs associated with the bar mitzvah celebration.
Parshat Vayeishev
Lessons from the Torah regarding proper childrearing and education.
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Dreams
Parshat Mikeitz
Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi explains that meaningful dreams emanate from a very high spiritual level. But does this mean that our dreams are messages from G-d? Should we be frightened by a dream that portends doom?
Parshat Vayigash
A collection of laws that pertain to traveling. Studying while traveling, praying while traveling the Traveler’s Prayer, and more.
Parshat Vayechi
Where to get buried: In Israel? Together with family?
Parshat Va'eira
Because when praying we stand before the King of kings, it is appropriate that we ensure that our environment is suiting, and that we dress in a respectable manner.
Parshat Bo
Mitzvot Done with the Right Hands, and Guidelines for Left-Handed People.
Parshat Beshalach
In order to enable the Jews to observe Shabbat while wandering in the desert, G-d provided them with a double portion of manna on Friday. To commemorate this miracle, the Sages instituted that we break bread over two complete loaves at the start of every Shabbat meal...
Parshat Yitro
The firstborn is a link in the chain that connects the souls of the younger siblings to their parents, and through them to G‑d. Therefore the siblings must respect him—just as they are obligated to respect their parents.
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Meat & Milk
Parshat Mishpatim
Several reasons have been suggested for this mitzvah. Some argue that it is cruel to cook a baby in the very milk that was intended to nourish it. Others suggest that the reason for this mitzvah is health related. Maimonides asserts that an ancient pagan ritual which involved the cooking and consumption of meat and milk is the source of the prohibition...
Parshat Terumah
The synagogues and study halls in the Diaspora are considered “miniature sanctuaries.” For this reason, we find that some of the physical characteristics of the Holy Temple are to be incorporated into the building of a synagogue . . .
Parshat Tetzaveh
The priests were required to wear special clothing when performing their service in the Holy Temple. Similarly, the Torah scholars of ancient Babylonia would dress impressively, so as to encourage people to honor the Torah that they represented . . .
Parshat Ki Tisa
The basic rule of thumb as far as having a gentile do work for a Jew on Shabbat is that if a Jew may not do it, a non-Jew cannot do it for him. There are, however, various exceptions to this rule...
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