Contact Us

Shehecheyanu

Shehecheyanu

 Email

The shehecheyanu blessing is recited, in addition to the regular blessing, whenever doing something for the first time that year, like doing a mitzvah, such as the first lighting the Chanukah candles, reading the Megillah on Purim, and taking the lulav and etrog on Sukkot.

In addition the first time each year one eats a fruit or vegetable which is seasonal, i.e., one which grows only at a certain time of the year, the fruit is considered a "new fruit" and this special blessing is recited.

The shehecheyanu should preferably be said before the regular blessing on the fruit, although some have the custom to say it afterwards. The blessing is said only if the fruit is ripe (not dried). Examples of seasonal fruits over which one can say this blessing: kiwi, fresh figs or dates, pomegranates, cherries, tangerines, cantaloupes, and strawberries.

Ba-ruch A-tah A-do-noi E-loi-hei-nu
Me-lech ha-o-lam she-he-chee-ya-nu v'ki-yi-ma-nu
vi-hi-gi-ya-nu liz-man ha-zeh.

Translation:

Blessed are You, L-rd our G‑d, King of the
Universe, who has granted us life, sustained us and
enabled us to reach this occasion.

Listen to the recitation of the Shehechiyanu blessing
© Copyright, all rights reserved. If you enjoyed this article, we encourage you to distribute it further, provided that you comply with Chabad.org's copyright policy.
 Email
Join the Discussion
Sort By:
12 Comments
1000 characters remaining
Sandra Dennis Greenbaum August 11, 2017

It was customary in my family to say the shehecheyanu when putting on new clothing for the first time. Is this a correct use of the blessing? And we have always recited this blessing when we are coming together for a family occasion. Reply

ian mednick Brooklyn July 27, 2017

Can one recite a the blessing for a new experience? Such as scuba diving for the first time or meeting an old friend for the first time that year? Reply

Rabbi Yossi Grossbaum, for Chabad.org August 27, 2017
in response to ian mednick:

Generally speaking the custom today is not to say the blessing in these sorts of situations. However, if you'd like to say the blessing you can always get a "new fruit" on which to say the blessing while also being mindful of the special experience or meeting. Reply

Ian Mednick August 27, 2017
in response to Rabbi Yossi Grossbaum, for Chabad.org:

Sounds tasty... thank you! :-) Reply

sharon chicago June 7, 2017

But I have heard it is not appropriate at a wedding. Why not? Reply

Simcha Bart for Chabad.org June 7, 2017

The prevailing custom is that Shehechiyanu is not recited. Sephardim have a custom that the groom makes a Shehechiyanu for his new Tallit which will also be the canopy for the Chupah. When reciting it he has in mind the joy of the wedding as well.

Reply

shar June 4, 2017

may one say shehechianu at a wedding. Reply

Scott Steiner Columbus, Ohio March 14, 2017

The beautiful Shehecheyanu I like saying the Shehecheyanu in Hebrew. It just has a more beautiful sound and feels more ancient and powerful. Thank you for you guidance with my Hebrew learning. Reply

jakob slovenia January 14, 2016

Nachon! In Hebrew, abosolutely. That would be helpful for all who are learning the language. And it would be right, too 😃. Reply

Rafael Sanchez February 27, 2014

Hebrew I would have liked to have seen it printed in Hebrew also. Reply

Anonymous london, On/Canada October 21, 2012

To be able to listen I agree with previous reader. It would be wonderful to be able to listen the blessing. It is my birthday and I would be so glad to hear it. It is beautiful and powerful. Thank you. Blessings!. Reply

Anonymous Bronx, NY November 19, 2011

help! It would really be helpful if there was a little speaker button we could click so we could hear the words being said! Not everyone studying here speaks the language! We are learning. Thank you! Just a suggestion I would love! Reply

Related Topics