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Videos on why we pray, the kabbalah of prayer, the struggles of prayer and lessons on praying on a Yacht

Video and Multimedia

Video and Multimedia

Videos on why we pray, the kabbalah of prayer, the struggles of prayer and lessons on praying on a Yacht

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An overview of the roots, purpose and practice of Jewish prayer.
The concept of prayer seems paradoxical: asking G-d, who is infinite and all knowing, to grant us our puny needs and desires?
In order to give one’s words wings with which they may fly, we endeavor to infuse them with meditative intentions. Learning to inspire prayer with meditation greatly enhances the experience and imbues it with enhanced meaning and reach. This series offers guided meditations appropriate to everyday prayer.
Video | 44:36
Prayer Book Blues
What’s the point of praying from a prayerbook? Why do we pray in Hebrew? Is it better to pray in shul? How to infuse your prayers with real emotion and meaning.
Video | 0:37
The Ladder
Rabbi Kadoozy answers a question about prayer and Jono asks G-d to write his term paper.
Video | 2:37
A Word from Jono
Jonathan finds out that the Siddur is AWESOME!!
The Talmud praises those who recite Psalms 145 – also known as the prayer of Ashrei – each day. This series provides thoughtful insights into the deeper meaning of the verses of this prayer.
From the story of the prophetess Chanah, we learn the proper way to approach G‑d and express our needs. (A text-based discussion of the first chapter of Samuel I.)
Video | 5:41
Selfless Prayer
In the Holy Temple, a Korban Olah, a Burnt sacrifice, was offered up twice daily, in the morning and at dusk. Our Sages teach that while we are in exile, “the prayers were established in place of the daily offerings.” ‘Korban,’ offering, shares the same Hebrew root as ‘Kiruv,’ closeness. The purpose of an offering is, that through it, we become closer to G-d. True closeness to G-d can be achieved when our prayers, like the Burnt Offering, are in order to connect with G-d, not for personal gain.
Vacationing at sea, a successful Jewish businessman was diligent to recite his daily prayers and inquired of the captain which direction was eastward. The captain asked, “Why your sudden interest in the boat’s navigation?” The businessman explained that our prayers ascend through Jerusalem, and a Jew faces there three times a day to beseech G-d.
Jewish people have three daily prayer services. The first is Shacharit (the morning prayer), then Minchah (the afternoon prayer), and finally Maariv (the evening prayer.) But from another perspective, one can argue that since the Jewish day begins at sundown, the first prayer is really the evening prayer. Does it make a difference if we view the order of the prayers as morning/afternoon/evening or as evening/morning/afternoon?