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Classic chassidic tales. There's no better way to make a point than to tell a story...

Chassidic Stories

Chassidic Stories

There's no better way to make a point than to tell a story...

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The innkeeper lived modestly, but he offered his guests his best rooms and did everything he could to make their stay comfortable.
“The community is too poor, and cannot shoulder the financial burden of this endeavor. And as for the local gevir, it is a waste of time even to approach him . . .”
As night fell, they tried to find their way out of the soggy forest but, blinded by sheets of rain, they could not find the right path
The young man slowly accumulated a small fortune of twelve gold coins and one copper coin.
When Berel heard that there would be a celebration in honor of a new Torah, he naively assumed that he would be welcomed to the joyful event.
The businessman was at his wits’ end. For years, he had eked out a living through the small concession that the Polish government had granted him. And now, his license was suddenly revoked, and he had no idea where his next few zlotys would come from.
“As you know, I am an expert tailor,” said the man, whose eyes still glistened with tears. “I make high-quality clothing for princes, nobles and other fine folks.
He is intent on the names printed in the thick ream of pages that sits in front of him. He reads the names, and from time to time uses a large black fountain pen to mark a name with an X.
How were the poor wretches supposed to raise money from the confinement of their prison cells?
“Meilech,” called the Maggid from his room. “Do you hear what they are saying right now in heaven?"
It once happened that that the young daughter of Nechunya the digger of wells fell into a deep well.
It once happened that the son of a non-Jewish family decided to convert to Judaism, an offense that could cost him dearly in those days, when it was illegal for a Christian to leave his faith.
“It is revealed to me from the heavens that the only profession in which you can succeed is thievery.”
One winter’s night, the family lay sleeping. Suddenly, they were awakened by a knock on the door. Clutching a candle, the teacher hastened to open the door. There he found a man half frozen and covered in snow.
The treacherous Jew, who had pretended to be a Catholic, would be put to death by burning in the city square.
It was a cold, wintry day, and he suddenly found himself in unfamiliar territory. Freezing and scared, he continued to wander deep into the night.
Rumors began to swirl that she and the tavernkeeper were up to no good.
Dressed in rags, with a pair of buckets of water resting on his rounded shoulders, the man looked up in surprise at the august group coming his way.
The village healer tried all her remedies, the big-city doctor prescribed a regimen of healthy foods, but the poor girl remained unable to move.
As he finally made his weary way to bed, he was arrested by the brokenhearted sound of Reb Zusha crying.
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