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Nearly Instant Vegan Thai Coconut Corn Soup

Nearly Instant Vegan Thai Coconut Corn Soup

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When I first came up with this soup, I was looking to make something speedy to serve with a main-dish salad. And speedy it is, taking only about fifteen minutes from start to finish, yet it tastes like a long-simmering soup. At first, I thought I was imagining things, but I've made it many times since, that's just how long it takes. The tiny bit of red curry gives it ample heat; if you'd like a spicier soup, use more, and for a less spicy effect, omit the red curry altogether.

6 servings

  • 1 tablespoon light olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 to 5 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, cut into short, narrow strips
  • Two 14- to 15-ounce cans light coconut milk
  • 1 ½ cups rice milk
  • One 16-ounce bag frozen corn
  • 2 teaspoons good-quality curry powder
  • ¼ teaspoon Thai red curry paste, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • ½ cup minced fresh cilantro

1. Heat the oil in a small soup pot. Add the garlic, the white parts of the scallions, and the bell pepper. Sauté over medium-low heat until softened and golden, 2 to 3 minutes.

2. Add the coconut milk, rice milk, corn, curry powder, and the green parts of the scallions. If using the curry paste, dissolve it in a small amount of water before adding to the soup.

3. Bring to a rapid simmer, then lower the heat. Cover and simmer gently for 5 minutes. Season with salt and remove from the heat.

4. Serve, passing around the cilantro for topping.

Calories: 225 Total fat: 12 g Protein: 3 g

Carbohydrates: 31 g Fiber: 3 g Sodium: 435 mg

Copyright © 2008 by Nava Atlas. From the book Vegan Express, published by Broadway Books, a division of Random House, Inc. Reprinted with permission.
Photographs by Susan Voisin.
© Copyright, all rights reserved. If you enjoyed this article, we encourage you to distribute it further, provided that you comply with Chabad.org's copyright policy.
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Discussion (16)
February 18, 2014
kosher ???
looking for kosher curry paste
diane
pgh,pa
August 28, 2012
Vegan wedding
I had the most wonderful meal recently at a vegan wedding. Best of all the stress of keeping dairy and meat separate caused no added stress for my sister. Our friends and family learned about a vegan diet. I now eat vegan several times a week.
Christine
Gates, NY
August 4, 2012
vegan
just for the record, some people, such as myself, are somewhat vegan due to food allergies ie soy, eggs.
Anonymous
boca raton, FL
September 9, 2008
kosher ?
Thai Coconut soup sounds great, the only question i have is where do you buy kosher coconut milk and kosher Thai red curry paste? I've searched all over the place and can't find it. Maybe I'm lookig in the wrong places.
Anonymous
June 8, 2008
substitutes
I make challah every friday using a tablespoon of flaxseed and a tablespoon and a half of water, also silk soy milk is OU kosher as are some other non-brand name soy milks. it only takes slight adjustment to a dish to make it vegan (unless it's gefelte fish or steak).
Anonymous
March 6, 2008
Theila
Vegans don't all do exactly the same thing. All people who define themselves as "vegan" want to eliminate animal byproducts from their diets, but some might do that a little more stringently than others, considering some things to be acceptable or unacceptable while others do not. And as time progresses, people often gradually become more or less stringent. So the best thing you can do is ask the person you want to cook for if their personal definition of "vegan" allows for the products you want to include. Thank you for trying so hard. Your consideration is admirable.
mayim
March 5, 2008
Thank you Tina, but I'm still confused.
I understand the concept of your analogy, about the plowing, but I don't necessarily agree. An ox doesn't wake up in the morning and begin to plow on its own (although I've known a few that would hook themselves up and start on their own if they could).

Honey Bees exist to pollinate and make honey, and they couldn't possibly consume all of their honey themselves, if they ever actually consume it at all. We would all die of starvation without pollination. And the honey bees would all die if they didn't make honey.

My desire here is to understand veganism, as I have vegan friends, and they don't always seem to agree on such subjects. I guess I'll just have to be confused.

Thank you for your time, Tina. And thank you Nava and Chabad.org for the great recipes.
theila
March 5, 2008
Letter to the Editor:
I have known that there are lots of vegan and vegetarian Jews for many years, and I think these blogs prove to you that there is a big Jewish demand for vegetarian and vegan information. There are lots of Jewish vegans and vegetarians. There are lots of Jews who want to live compassionately, to treat animals with compassion, and we do that by being vegetarians and vegans. So please keep posting vegetarian and vegan information for the increasing number of Jewish vegans and vegetarians. Thank you very much.
Mayim
March 4, 2008
How fabulous!
We thought we must be the only vegan Jewish family around - how great to see these recipes featured on here! Yummy cake. And I want to make the soup tonight!

Honey is an animal product like milk - produced from the body of the animal. Pollinated items, apples, for instance, are somewhat like plowing a field with an ox and a plow. The vegetables in that field are still vegetarian - they contain no animal products. Therefore they are vegan. Not 100% of vegans consider honey to be animal product, but generally they do.
Tina
Deerfield, IL
March 4, 2008
Vegan and Vegetarianism
I would love to see some vegan and vegetarian recipes for Pesach---it is so hard to get variety and know what to do for protein during pesach.
Susan S
California
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