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Shabbat in Space

Shabbat in Space

The Legacy of Ilan Ramon

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I first met Ilan Ramon at an almost clandestine gathering in my hometown of Satellite Beach, Florida. NASA personnel and Israeli Security teams had taken extra security precautions to ensure that nothing would go wrong. Even the location had been kept secret until the very day of the meeting.

Ilan addressed the assembled Jewish community leaders. After his speech he approached me. He greeted me with a warm hug and presented me with his request: “Rabbi I need to talk with you. I want to keep Shabbat while in space but no one can tell me how to do it!”

And that was how our friendship began.

Ilan was a very special Jew. He often expressed the thought that he saw his trip to space as a mission. “I will represent the entire Jewish people,” he would say. As a representative of the Jewish people he wanted to do everything in the very best possible way Jewishly; including keeping Shabbat and eating only kosher food.

Ilan Ramon (left) with Rabbi Zvi Konikov
Ilan Ramon (left) with Rabbi Zvi Konikov

“Kosher food?” the NASA staff shrugged their shoulders at the Jewish astronaut’s strange request. Ilan was not one to give up easily and a solution was found. NASA contacted My Own Meals, a company in Deerfield, Ill. that sells certified kosher food in "thermo-stabilized" sealed pouches for campers.

Related Links
The Columbia Tragedy - Five Years Later
16 Minutes From Home (Rabbi Konikov's voice at 5:06 minutes)
Rabbi Konikov on Ilan Ramon (Video)

Shabbat also presented quite a challenge. A day/night cycle in orbit is 90 minutes long, which means that a week lasts a mere ten and a half hours from start to finish! Would Ilan need to keep Shabbat every half day?!

At his behest I brought his case before some of the world's leading rabbinic authorities, who ruled that he would keep the Shabbat times of his place of departure – Cape Canaveral.

Ilan’s Jewish pride and his resolve to keep the Torah thousands of miles from earth, left a very strong impact on our community and on Jews all over the world.

Ilan had wanted to visit our Chabad House before his trip to space, but his tight schedule did not allow it. We had made up that after landing he would come to a special reception which we would prepare in his honor. We never imagined that his space mission would end in such tragedy...

On Shabbat morning, I walked with my daughter to Shul. At 9:16 am, the estimated re-entry time, her eyes were fixed on her watch, waiting for the sonic boom signaling the shuttle's re-entry. But the skies were silent.

We arrived to shul and the prayers began. Suddenly a friend from the local police station rushed in and told us that there had been an accident and everybody on board was killed. People began streaming to the Chabad house. Some placed flowers at the foot of the digital sign wishing the crew members a safe return. The Shabbat passed in a surreal blur of sorrow.

A week later, on Friday morning at exactly 9:16 am – the time when they were supposed to have landed – a short but heart-wrenching ceremony was held and I was asked to share some thoughts. The atmosphere was thick with sadness. In the name of Ilan and his family, I thanked the staff of NASA for their efforts and tried my best to lift their spirits. “Ilan told me, 'Jerusalem we have a problem!'” I said. “He wanted to know how to keep Shabbat where there's a sunset every 90 minutes and a new 'week' every ten and half hours...” I told them about his supreme efforts to fulfill the mitzvot of his Creator while in orbit.

“Ilan Ramon taught us a powerful message: No matter how fast we're going, no matter how important our work, we need to pause and think about why we're here on Earth."

This, if you will, is the legacy of Ilan Ramon.

Note: A voice-over of Rabbi Konikov's remarks was included in the NASA film "16 Minutes From Home" produced as a memorial for the Columbia crew (you can hear Rabbi Konikov's voice at 5:06 minutes).

Rabbi Zvi Konikov and his wife are co-directors of Chabad of the Space & Treasure Coasts, Florida.
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Discussion (6)
February 9, 2008
Our son was named after Ilan Ramon
Our son was named after Ilan Ramon; he was born a short time after the tragedy. lt is our honor to have a child as a namesake for an amazing courageous pioneer.
Yehudis
Louisville, KY
February 6, 2008
Ilan Z
The Poem "In Memory of the Columbia" was so moving! I remember that day, thinking they got to see our planet the way The Creator saw it, and now it was time to hold his hand!
Anonymous
Pittsburgh, PA
February 4, 2008
I remember...
I remember the day when I saw it happen live right before my eyes...

So sad, but as it says:

"All of Israel has a place in the world to come as it is said, 'And Your people are all righteous.' They shall inherit the land forever. They are the branch of My planting, the work of My hands, in wwhich I take pride." - Sanhedrin 90a

G-d bless his memory for good for ever.
Anonymous
February 4, 2008
Ilan Z
May the Angels protect you and provide you with all their love.
Toda Ilan for your dignity and Jewish heart.
chmouel, Holocaust survivor and ex Israeli Paratrooper
samuel shene
Toronto, Canada
February 4, 2008
In Memory of the Columbia
When you cannot see the planets for your too close to the stars
And the glory and the wonder touch the soul of what you are
When the bodies of the Heavens touch all that you have known
You can touch the face of G-d for surely you are home

So do not mourn for us for we're with the wonders of the sky
The Creator of all being whose Breath enlivened you and I
We are the Summer Solstice and nebulas you see
We are reaching for the Hand of Him who made life into dream
We're now in every constellation on the bright side of the moon
We're the stardust of the galaxies and the equinox of noon
And when you see a comet we'll be writing in the sky
Love more among each other while you still have the time
For our lives are but memory in the orbit of your days
A universe where we converse among the words you pray
For the light years of the heavens are holding all we're sown
We will not be as you knew us, but we are safely home
Eric S. Kingston
CA
February 3, 2008
Ilan of blessed memory
There was something about Ilan which connected us to him. His tragic death brought such sorrow to me and I did not know the man. All around us Jews were mourning for him as if he was our brother which indeed he was as we saw with his death how we the Jewish people are all brothers.May his memory be blessed and may G-D bless his wife and children with good in all things spirituel and material
Anonymous
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