Here's a great tip:
Enter your email address and we'll send you our weekly magazine by email with fresh, exciting and thoughtful content that will enrich your inbox and your life, week after week. And it's free.
Oh, and don't forget to like our facebook page too!
Contact Us
Kindness is great, but sometimes we need guidance on how to be kind. Luckily, the Torah offers exactly that guidance...

Kindness Minutes

Kindness Minutes

 Email
A healthy Jewish people is one big, caring family where each individual loves the other like his or her own self. And love for those closest to home nurtures love for the extended family of humanity . . .
Nothing we own is really ours to begin with—G‑d gives to us so we can give to others. Giving is a mitzvah and a responsibility. As such, it comes with its own set of dos and don'ts.
When G‑d made the world, He left us the task of injecting it with spirituality and meaning. Nothing accomplishes this goal like tzedakah . . .
Lending money is the highest form of charity, far greater than giving handouts. A handout may preserve a life for a day, but a loan preserves that sense of self-sufficiency necessary to get back on your feet.
No matter how much respect we give our parents, we can never repay them for their part in bringing us into this world . . .
No frowns, no tears, no gloomy faces. None of that is going to heal anybody. When visiting the sick, your job is to provide a little smile, some hope, and maybe even a few laughs.
Walking down the street, you find something. An iPod, a wallet, a lost cat. Finders keepers? Or should you leave it and walk on?
Consoling a mourner is one of those challenging situations that we would all rather avoid. But it's an act of kindness and it's not really so difficult: What's really needed most is the fact that you are there.
Words carry the potential of causing catastrophic harm, often tearing asunder families and friendships. The destructive power of negative speech is surpassed only by the beneficial power of positive speech . . .
Which crime is worse, financial exploitation or verbal abuse? “Money can be reimbursed,” the Talmud notes, “but the hurt from words is irreparable . . .”