Contact Us

Teshuvah: The Art of Return

Teshuvah: The Art of Return

 Email

The world thinks--says chassidic master Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi in one of his discourses--that teshuvah is for sinners. But in truth, also the perfectly righteous person must do teshuvah -- that is, return to the root-source of his soul...

Commonly translated as "repentance," teshuvah literally means "return." Teshuvah is the soul's capacity to return to its original state, to its pristine core. As we pass through life, we are invariably coarsened and sullied by our errors and misjudgments, or simply by the travails of physical life; but our innermost self, the "veritable part of G‑d" that is the essence of our soul -- remains untouched. Teshuvah is the G‑d-given ability to access and reconnect to that untouched self, reestablish our lives upon its foundation, and even redefine a negative past in its purifying light.

Here are thirteen essays and stories that explore the dynamics of teshuvah, the what, why and how of the most powerful force known to man -- the power of self-transformation:

Insights:

The Best Kept Secret in the World
by Yanki Tauber

Where is Life's "Undo" Function?
by Tzvi Freeman

Vistas
by Jay Litvin

Voicemail
by Israel Rubin

A Voice from Heaven
by Dovi Scheiner

How to Change the Past
by Yanki Tauber

G‑d's Business
based on the Rebbe's teachings

Stories:

Forgiveness
by Jay Litvin

The Tenth Jew
by Yrachmiel Tilles

A Pound of Candles
by Rabbi S. Y. Zevin

A Tzaddik's Repentance
by Tuvia Bolton

Movement
by Tzivia Emmer

The Damaged Diamond
by Pesach and Channa Burston

© Copyright, all rights reserved. If you enjoyed this article, we encourage you to distribute it further, provided that you comply with Chabad.org's copyright policy.
 Email
Join the Discussion
Sort By:
3 Comments
1000 characters remaining
Jorge Munuzuri Queretaro, Qro. MEXICO October 5, 2011

Teshuvah: The Art of Return Teshuvah is the G‑d-given ability to access and reconnect to that untouched self, reestablish our lives upon its foundation, and even redefine a negative past in its purifying light.
Yanki Tauber in “How to Change the Past” tells us: Not just man, but every object, force and phenomenon has both a "body" and a "soul."

Would be rightful to think that to get rid of a continuous assault of a bad spirit concerning wrongdoings of the past an analysis would have to be made in order to get a change in the “soul” of the wrongdoing? Reply

Anonymous January 5, 2010

thankyou!! this is something unique that can help clarify what direction we must take as Jews.
this is really a very beautiful article on direction and purpose! Reply

mendel September 21, 2009

very nice... but you have some more articles on teshuva... for example, the new one about ctrl z by rabbi shemtov... Reply

Related Topics