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Day Two of Week 2: Gevurah of Gevurah

Day Two of Week 2: Gevurah of Gevurah

9th Day of the Omer

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Examine the discipline factor of discipline. Is my discipline disciplined or is it excessive. Do I have enough discipline in my life and in my interactions? Am I organized? Is my time used efficiently? Why do I have problems with discipline and what can I do to enhance it? Do I take time each day for personal accounting of my schedule and accomplishments? Does my discipline include the other six aspects (see here for more on these traits), without which discipline cannot be effective and healthy?

Exercise for the day: Make a detailed plan for spending your day and at the end of the day see if you've lived up to it.

From A Spiritual Guide to the Omer by Simon Jacobson
Republished with the permission of MeaningfulLife.com. If you wish to republish this article in a periodical, book, or website, please email permissions@meaningfullife.com
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jim dallas April 21, 2017

discipline....i work hard at it....want to do more, but have to be disciplined about it. Reply

Leslie Ann Sarasota April 19, 2017

How does one balance one's own disciplines with those of the person with whom one is living? We argue often about my disciplines versus his disciplines. I am more disciplined with cleanliness and the home and food and comforts. He is more disciplined with money and use of resources. ultimately one of us tells the other to "Grow up!" I fear we are driving love out of our home and our relationship because of our differences in discipline. Reply

Rabbi Yossi Grossbaum, for Chabad.org Folsom, CA April 25, 2017
in response to Leslie Ann:

Your own discipline is your responsibility, another's discipline is their's. When you notice a lack of discipline in another it's important to think twice before criticizing them - what is motivating the criticism? Is it love? If not, it's time to strengthen the underlying love that should be motivating the discipline. See here for more. Reply

Lamont Myers Hallendale Fl. May 2, 2016

Knowing my abilities and limitations. Though I have a tendency to over extended myself, discipline corrects me. Reminds me when to speak and when to listen. Which is quite challenging living in our existence today. It's a very good trait when it comes Torah study, prayers. I look forward to the enjoyment after study. Obeying commandments and performance of mitzvahs. Discipline of discipline always welcomed here. Reply

Anonymous May 1, 2016

After many countings of the Omer over the years, I have come closer and closer to balancing self-discipline with the other parts of life, personal and group endeavors. Thank you for helping us count the Omer each year! Reply

Jeremy McCandlish Pittsburgh April 13, 2015

Part of disciplined discipline is making sure that all the mistakes we want to forget are noted in a few places where we will actually l look.

That way, we can **eventually** assume responsibility, instead of just forgetting about something forever.

"Forgetting" can be an easy, unconscious way of "giving up" without considering the consequences-- the combination of which, in my experience at least, is usually a terrible idea.

(e.g. "Oh, I guess I forgot about that project! Or did I just give up without admitting it to myself? Sometimes it's hard to tell. At any rate, now I can forget about my GPA.")

A note from personal experience: Dave Crenshaw teaches a method that seems (so far) to work.

At least, it has survived one Pesach -- i.e. almost nine full days of neglect -- without breaking.

Much success in your journeys Reply

Daniel Frank Toronto April 5, 2013

"Sufficient degree of detail, one will not follow plan; sufficient generalization of plan, one will follow it. So, what is to be learned?" Reply

Martha April 3, 2013

Your advice on time managment is the first one I have ever read that really makes a lot of sense and is easy to grasp. I just hope that I can remember to form a hbit of taking an account of my day. A lot of my time seems to get lost even though i plan out my day. thank you. Reply

Reus Chaya Worcest, MA April 16, 2012

Today's exercise was very helpful in getting back on track to set goals for each day. Thank you , Rabbi Jacobson, Reply

Chava Englewood April 15, 2012

I think it would apply for me in this realm of gvurah sheh be gvurah to be less judgemental of others. Reply

Anonymous BALA, PA April 27, 2011

I appreciate and learn from Rabi Jacobson's writing. And, tonight...given the suggestion to plan the day and then check later to see if it was done according to plan: depending upon the degree of detail of the planning, one could be sure of either behaving according to plan or not. Sufficient degree of detail, one will not follow plan; sufficient generalization of plan, one will follow it. So, what is to be learned? Reply

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