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Quinoa with Roasted Vegetables

Quinoa with Roasted Vegetables

and Balsamic Reduction Syrup

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This year, we have the unique opportunity to celebrate Rosh Hashanah during the summer season. And if bright red tomatoes don’t scream summer, I don’t know what does. Add in some roasted asparagus and quinoa, and you’ve got a perfectly light summery side dish.


Measure out 2 cups of raw quinoa. You can use white or red quinoa, whichever you prefer.


Soak the quinoa for at least 1 hour, and cook according to the package instructions. Fluff with a fork and set aside.


Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400° F and cut up the tomatoes and asparagus.


Spread the vegetables over a greased baking tray. Drizzle with olive oil and salt.


Bake for approximately 25 minutes, until vegetables are soft and slightly brown around the edges.


Serve with a balsamic vinegar reduction. You can mix the sauce into the quinoa, or leave it separately on the side for people to pour over as they please. It has a strong, unique flavor, so I prefer to leave it separate and make it easy for people to opt out.

To make the sauce, mix the balsamic vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan. Bring them to a boil over a low flame, stirring to incorporate the sugar into the liquid. Reduce to a very slight simmer, stirring every 5 minutes until the liquid is reduced by half. It will thicken and become more syrupy as it cools.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups quinoa
  • 1 bunch of asparagus (approximately 1 lb.)
  • 2 containers grape tomatoes (approximately 60 tomatoes)
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tsp. sugar

Directions:

  1. Cook the quinoa according to the package instructions. Fluff with a fork and set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 400° F.
  3. Cut the grape tomatoes in half, and the asparagus into bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and salt and bake for 20–25 minutes.
  4. Mix the vegetables with the quinoa.
  5. In a small saucepan, mix the balsamic vinegar and sugar. Bring them to a boil over a low flame, stirring to incorporate the sugar into the liquid. Reduce to a very slight simmer, stirring every 5 minutes until the liquid is reduced by half. It will thicken and become more syrupy as it cools.
  6. Serve the balsamic reduction sauce on the side, so guests can choose how much to drizzle on their quinoa, or mix it in immediately before serving.

What’s on your Rosh Hashanah menu?

Miriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
Note: The laws of Shabbat rest mandate that all cooking and baking be done before Shabbat, and regulate food preparation done on Shabbat in other ways as well. For more information, see Food Preparation on Shabbat.
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Miriam Szokovski September 15, 2015

asparagus substitute You could use green beans instead of the asparagus. Roasted peppers would also be good. Reply

Anonymous Australia September 12, 2015

What could be used in the place of asparagus? Thanks Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 25, 2013

Bland? Thanks for your feedback. I'm sorry you were disappointed with the end result.
I'd love to know what went wrong - did you make the balsamic reduction syrup? It's so strong in flavor, it's hard to imagine how it could taste bland. Reply

Anonymous Tampa September 16, 2013

I'm sorry I made this... Made this as instructed. So bland! What a waste of ingredients! Have you actually made this recipe? I'm sorry I made it. Waste of time. Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 7, 2013

Balsamic Vinegar Hi Miriam,

I am not familiar with the lead issue, but the brand of kosher Balsamic vinegar I use is Bartenura. Reply

Anonymous September 7, 2013

kosher balsamic vinager Balsamic vinagers are made from aged grape pressings and therefore they need to be made by kosher manufacturers. There are a number of great Kosher brands. The one I've used is the Bartenura. Reply

Miriam B. NYC September 4, 2013

Are Blasamic Vinegars Kosher? I stopped using balsamic vinegar after I learned that most brands contained
high levels of lead and I've been trying to rule out sources, since I live in Olde New York City and Miami Beach. I have very high levels of lead. Then I read somewhere Balsamic Vinegar was never Kosher, forgot why. I really do like it, but will give tip up,
unless you know of a Kosher, innocuous brand. Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 4, 2013

Print-friendly version Hi Samantha,

We don't currently have that option, but you can copy and paste just the actual recipe (at the end of the post) into a word document and print that.

Thanks for asking.

Shana Tova. Reply

Anonymous September 4, 2013

how to print Highlight just the recipe and instructions (near the end of the article). Then click on right mouse button and choose print. When the print window opens, choose "selection" and then print. You'll get just the recipe on one piece of paper. You can also choose copy instead of print and then paste your selection into Word. Reply

M Barkan Earth September 3, 2013

Quinoa While quinoa is a wonderful and tasty grain it's also the staple food for people living in the northern Andes Mountains. With American food importers offering exorbitant prices at the local markets, the locals often find themselves unable to afford to buy one of their most important foods. Sometimes our food importers buy all the crop and then it's not available at any price to those same locals. It's great to share recipes, but until we can grow this crop in the USA, we should stop depleting a crop needed by people indigenous to the regions that do grow it. But: it is tasty. Reply

Samantha Los Angeles September 2, 2013

Printing Is there a print-friendly version of this recipe? I'd like to make it and put it in my recipe book but it's 6 pages long..... Reply

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