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Molad Times

Molad Times

Molad Times for the Jewish Years 5770-5775 (2009-2015)

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When blessing the new month in the synagogue on the Shabbat before Rosh Chodesh, it is customary to announce the time that the molad (birth of the new moon) occurs in Jerusalem, so that it can be kept in mind while saying the blessing.

Traditionally, the time is announced in hours, minutes and chalakim -- e.g., "The molad will occur Sunday evening, eight minutes and seven chalakim after seven o'clock." A chelek is one 1080th part of an hour, or 3.33 seconds. In this table, we have noted the time of the molad in hours and minutes (e.g., 7:08 PM), and we've also noted the number of chalakim, for use in the traditional announcement.

All times listed here are Jerusalem times, and are so announced in the synagogue regardless of location.

For more about the molad, see What is the molad? at the bottom of this page.

Molad Times for 5770 (2009-2010)

Molad for Month of

Day of Week

Date

Time

Tishrei

Shabbat

September 19, 2009

10:47 (7 chalakim) AM

Cheshvan

Sunday

October 18, 2009

11:31 (8 chalakim) PM

Kislev

Tuesday

November 17, 2009

12:15 (9 chalakim) PM

Tevet

Thursday

December 17, 2009

12:59 (10 chalakim) AM

Shevat

Friday

January 15, 2010

1:43 (11 chalakim) PM

Adar

Sunday

February 14, 2010

2:27 (12 chalakim) AM

Nissan

Monday

March 15, 2010

3:11 (13 chalakim) PM

Iyar

Wednesday

April 14, 2010

3:55 (14 chalakim) AM

Sivan

Thursday

May 13, 2010

4:39 (15 chalakim) PM

Tamuz

Shabbat

June 12, 2010

5:23 (16 chalakim) AM

Av

Sunday

July 11, 2010

6:07 (17 chalakim) PM

Elul

Tuesday

August 10, 2010

6:52:00 AM


Click here to convert Secular to Jewish dates

Molad Times for 5771 (2010-11)

Molad for Month of

Day of Week

Date

Time

Tishrei

Wednesday

September 8, 2010

7:36 (1 chelek) PM

Cheshvan

Friday

October 8, 2010

8:20 (2 chalakim) AM

Kislev

Shabbat

November 6, 2010

9:04 (3 chalakim)  PM

Tevet

Monday

December 6, 2010

9:48 (4 chalakim) AM

Shevat

Tuesday

January 4, 2011

10:32 (5 chalakim) PM

Adar I

Thursday

February 3, 2011

11:16 (6 chalakim) AM

Adar II

Shabbat

March 5, 2011

12:00 (7 chalakim) AM

Nissan

Sunday

April 3, 2011

12:44 (8 chalakim) PM

Iyar

Tuesday

May 3, 2011

1:28 (9 chalakim) AM

Sivan

Wednesday

June 1, 2011

2:12 (10 chalakim) PM

Tamuz

Friday

July 1, 2011

2:56 (11 chalakim) AM

Av

Shabbat

July 30, 2011

3:40 (12 chalakim) PM

Elul

Monday

August 29, 2011

4:24 (13 chalakim) AM


Click here to convert Secular to Jewish dates

Molad Times for 5772 (2011-2012)

Molad for Month of

Day of Week

Date

Time

Tishrei

Tuesday

September 27, 2011

5:08 (14 chalakim) PM

Cheshvan

Thursday

October 27, 2011

5:52 (15 chalakim) AM

Kislev

Friday

November 25, 2011

6:36 (16 chalakim) PM

Tevet

Sunday

December 25, 2011

7:20 (17 chalakim) AM

Shevat

Monday

January 23, 2012

8:05 PM

Adar

Wednesday

February 22, 2012

8:49 (1 chelek) AM

Nissan

Thursday

March 22, 2012

9:33 (2 chalakim) PM

Iyar

Shabbat

April 21, 2012

10:17 (3 chalakim) AM

Sivan

Sunday

May 20, 2012

11:01 (4 chalakim) PM

Tammuz

Tuesday

June 19, 2012

11:45 (5 chalakim) AM

Av

Thursday

July 19, 2012

12:29 (6 chalakim) AM

Elul

Friday

August 17, 2012

1:13 (7 chalakim) PM


Click here to convert Secular to Jewish dates

Molad Times for 5773 (2012-2013)

Molad for Month of

Day of Week

Date

Time

Tishrei

Sunday

September 16, 2012

1:57 (8 chalakim) AM

Cheshvan

Monday

October 15, 2012

2:41 (9 chalakim) PM

Kislev

Wednesday

November 14, 2012

3:25 (10 chalakim) AM

Tevet

Thursday

December 13, 2012

4:09 (11 chalakim) PM

Shevat

Shabbat

January 12, 2013

4:53 (12 chalakim) AM

Adar

Sunday

February 10, 2013

5:37 (13 chalakim) PM

Nissan

Tuesday

March 12, 2013

6:21 (14 chalakim) AM

Iyar

Wednesday

April 10, 2013

7:05 (15 chalakim) PM

Sivan

Friday

May 10, 2013

7:49 (16 chalakim) AM

Tamuz

Shabbat

June 8, 2013

8:33 (17 chalakim) PM

Av

Monday

July 8, 2013

9:18 AM

Elul

Tuesday

August 6, 2013

10:02 (1 chelek) PM


Click here to convert Secular to Jewish dates

Molad Times for 5774 (2013-2014)

Molad for Month of

Day of Week

Date

Time

Tishrei

Thursday

September 5, 2013

10:46 (2 chalakim) AM

Cheshvan

Friday

October 4, 2013

11:30 (3 chalakim) PM

Kislev

Sunday

November 3, 2013

12:14 (4 chalakim) PM

Tevet

Tuesday

December 3, 2013

12:58 (5 chalakim) AM

Shevat

Wednesday

January 1, 2014

1:42 (6 chalakim) PM

Adar I

Friday

January 31, 2014

2:26 (7 chalakim) AM

Adar II

Shabbat

March 1, 2014

3:10 (8 chalakim) PM

Nissan

Monday

March 31, 2014

3:54 (9 chalakim) AM

Iyar

Tuesday

April 29, 2014

4:38 (10 chalakim) PM

Sivan

Thursday

May 29, 2014

5:22 (11 chalakim) AM

Tamuz

Friday

June 27, 2014

6:06 (12 chalakim) PM

Av

Sunday

July 27, 2014

6:50 (13 chalakim) AM

Elul

Monday

August 25, 2014

7:34 (14 chalakim) PM


Click here to convert Secular to Jewish dates

Molad Times for 5775 (2014-2015)

Molad for Month of

Day of Week

Date

Time

Tishrei

Wednesday

September 24, 2014

8:18 (15 chalakim) AM

Cheshvan

Thursday

October 23, 2014

9:02 (16 chalakim) PM

Kislev

Shabbat

November 22, 2014

9:46 (17 chalakim) AM

Tevet

Sunday

December 21, 2014

10:31 PM

Shevat

Tuesday

January 20, 2015

11:15 (1 chelek) AM

Adar

Wednesday

February 18, 2015

11:59 (2 chalakim)PM

Nissan

Friday

March 20, 2015

12:43 (3 chalakim) PM

Iyar

Sunday

April 19, 2015

1:27 (4 chalakim) AM

Sivan

Monday

May 18, 2015

2:11 (5 chalakim) PM

Tamuz

Wednesday

June 17, 2015

2:55 (6 chalakim) AM

Av

Thursday

July 16, 2015

3:39 (7 chalakim) PM

Elul

Shabbat

August 15, 2015

4:23 (8 chalakim) AM


Click here to convert Secular to Jewish dates

What is the molad?

The Jewish calendar is lunar-based, with each month representing one lunar cycle -- the time it takes for the moon to complete one orbit around the earth.

The molad is the time of the moon's "birth." There is a point in the moon's orbit in which it is positioned directly between the earth and the sun, making it invisible to anyone standing on earth's surface. The molad occurs when the moon has moved far enough from this position that a thin crescent of its illuminated surface becomes visible, marking the start of a new Jewish month.

The time it takes for the moon to complete one orbit around the earth -- as calculated by sages and confirmed by astronomical observation -- is 29 days, 12 hours and 793 chalakim (there are 1,080 chalakim or "parts" in an hour, hence a chelek is 3.33... seconds). This represents the average time from molad to molad. The actual moment at which the moon becomes visible will vary slightly from the average molad, depending on the relative positions of the earth, moon and sun to each other at any given month, where on earth the observer is standing, the length of twilight at given seasons of the year, and other astronomical variables.

For this reason the Jewish calendar is “tweaked” so that Rosh Chodesh -- the first of the month -- is as close as possible to the time in which the moon would actually be seen in Jerusalem if we were still relying on actual observation of the moon to establish the start of a new month (as was done until the 5th century C.E.). Also, because a month has to be made up of whole days, the Jewish month alternates between 29 and 30 days. This is why Rosh Chodesh will often occur a day or more after the average molad.

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Discussion (6)
August 14, 2013
To David
In any given month there could be a difference between the moon and the actual visible moon of a day or so. As per Maimonides, part of the calendar structure (its tweaks) is to push Rosh Chodesh towards the actual molad of that month.
Rabbi Shlomo Yaffe
August 7, 2013
The calendar is not tweaked. The mean molad remains in fairly good sync with the astronomical molad because the value of the mean molad and the mean astronomical lunation period are less than one second apart.-- accurate to one day in 14000 years. Most of the variation comes because the year is chaser (353 days) or malee (355 days)
David
Queens NY
January 3, 2011
RE: Molad of Shevat
In the current prefixed calendar, the purpose of the calculating the molad is not in order for us to know when to fix a specific Rosh Chodesh during the year. That is mostly set on a predetermined cycle of months of alternating lengths, with the few months that are not fixed adjusting themselves according to the required length of that year. So what do we need to calculate the molads for? The cumulative calculation of the molads helps us determine the date of Rosh Hashanah, as you can read in Maimonides’ work on the subject ( 947925 ). For this reason, the date of a given Rosh Chodesh is completely independent of the molad. (Incidentally even the date of Rosh Hashanah can sometimes be as much as two days after the Molad, as explained halacha 4 of the above link.)

So you ask, why do we announce the molad each month if it has nothing to do with Rosh Chodesh? I found the following explanation in the Shaar Hakolel (by Rabbi Avraham David Lavut - 19th century). He explains that in the days when the moon was sanctified by bet din, after testimony of the real molad (appearance of the moon) of the moon was heard, a special meal--replete with prayers for a good month--was held. Our prayers for the new month on the Shabbat before Rosh Chodesh mirror those prayers. As such, announcing the molad is a re-enactment of sorts of the testimony given in times gone by.
Menachem Posner for Chabad.org
Montreal, QC
January 2, 2011
Molad of Shvat
Please explain why - if the molad for the coming month of Shvat is on Tues night- Rosh Chodesh is Thursday and not Wednesday?
Anonymous
July 27, 2009
July 22 09 eclipse
A solar eclipse is by definition the physical molad, because there the moon passing the sun can be seen. (This definition of Molad differs from the one on this web site. I have read that which molad time used is a machlokes). This past month the solar eclipse occurred between 1:00 AM and 2:00 AM UT (similar to GMT) depending where in Asia you observed it. So Jerusalem time would be 2 hours later, or between 2-4 AM. This will give you an example of the difference between the average used for the molad compared to the actual molad which can differ by several hours.
Marc Engel
Far Rock, NY
November 9, 2007
Let Moshiach Come
I see you have times for 5770. That should be the last year we need them---Moshiach should tell us next time!
Anonymous
LA, CA