Contact Us

Charity Questions & Answers

Charity Questions & Answers

 Email
Banking has always been a Jewish profession, and in truth, every Jew is a banker. I may have money in my pocket, but it was merely deposited with me . . .
Says the Talmud, Rabbi Eleazar used to give a coin to a poor man and immediately begin to pray.
Does it still count as charity? How can one ever be sure that the money goes to the right cause?
When a person gives charity, he is not sanctifying merely his food, or some other possession, or his mental capabilities; he is giving up something in which he invested his whole self...
We spend so much money, time and energy on synagogues, Jewish schools religious institutions. Wouldn't it be better if we applied all those resources to alleviating all the suffering in our world?
The mezuzah on our front door seems to act as a beacon that draws charity-seeking individuals to our door at all hours of the evening and night. Frankly, we are considering removing it!
I have a menorah, it is gold-plated, it cost about $50. To buy anything better, anything more expensive, would have seemed self-indulgent; who would benefit but my own family and the shopkeeper?
We give charity, and pray for health, wealth and a good year. Are we "bribing" G-d?
I've always had a hard time saying "no" to people. So everyone assumes that I'm always available. And when I need something, no one even offers...
I know we are meant to give a tenth of our income (after tax) to charity. What if I volunteer my time for a charity? Can I deduct that from the required ten percent?
Right now, he acts stingily. Somewhere, deep inside, hides his inner philanthropist.
G‑d is surely not a hypocrite. If He tells us to do something, He should do it Himself as well. So shouldn't G‑d be obligated to feed the poor? Why doesn't He help His own children rather than commanding us to do it for Him?
I feel taken for granted, unappreciated and exhausted!
If the foundation for G‑d’s forgiveness and atonement was initially the sacrifice on the altar, how does one now find forgiveness and atonement, since the Temple and physical sacrifices no longer exist?
I have a friend who, whenever he says that he will or will not do something, always adds the disclaimer bli neder (lit. “without an oath”). What’s up with that?
Related Topics