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Is There a Blessing or Jewish Prayer For Earthquakes?

Is There a Blessing or Jewish Prayer For Earthquakes?

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The Talmud (Berachot 54a) tells us that whoever witnesses an earthquake —as well as a number of other natural phenomena in which G‑d's awesome power is apparent —should immediately say either one of the following two blessings:

Baruch Atta Ado-noy Elo-hai-nu Melech ha'olam
osei ma'asei vereisheet.

translation: Blessed are You, L‑rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who reenacts the works of creation.

Baruch Atta Ado-noy Elo-hai-nu Melech ha'olam shekocho ugevurato malei olam.
translation: Blessed are You, L‑rd our G‑d, King of the universe, whose power and might fill the world.

This helps bring into focus how the forces of nature are all truly from G‑d and expressions of His majesty.

Rabbi Menachem Posner serves as staff editor for Chabad.org.
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jwarrior Yokohama, Japan August 23, 2011

Awesome Since 3/11 earthquake and tsunami, we are still experiencing many tremors. There are no specific times and they last a while. Reply

Baruch Davidson August 23, 2011

Once the earthquake is over... After a few seconds have passed from when you felt the tremors, the blessing should be said without the middle "atah ...haolam". Reply

Rebecca Montreal, QC June 23, 2010

thanks! be nice to see it in Hebrew writing!
Just recited both--earthquake in Montreal! Scary! Reply

Bracha Mandelbaum-Levin San Diego, CA February 5, 2010

Earthquakes That's good to know!
Living here in Southern California for 7 years, I have been through at least 4 that I could feel the house shaking.
I missed the opportunity, but not sure I am anxious for another one.
I guess it is something like Krias Yam Suf Shira (Song After the Splitting of the Sea)...we thank G-d for the Miracles not rejoice in the loss of life. Reply

Anonymous Brooklyn, NY January 28, 2010

we also say it when we hear thunder and lightning Reply

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