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At the Shavuot Festival meal, all the Rebbes said words of Torah from the Baal Shem Tov and a story about him.

What Rebbes Do on Shavuot Night

What Rebbes Do on Shavuot Night

At the Shavuot Festival meal, all the Rebbes said words of Torah from the Baal Shem Tov and a story about him.

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What Rebbes Do on Shavuot Night
At the Shavuot Festival meal, all the Rebbes said words of Torah from the Baal Shem Tov and a story about him.

On the first night of Shavuot, the Rebbe Rashab of Chabad would pray the Evening Prayer at great length, the same as he would on the first night of Rosh Hashanah, and with a similar extra measure of devotion. However, unlike Rosh Hashanah, he did so privately in his room, so very few people were aware of it...

His [Reshab’s] son and successor, the Rebbe Rayatz used to say that every year on Shavuot, the same Divine revelation that took place at Mt Sinai is repeated again, and even if we can’t perceive it, any Jew who arouses within himself the commitment to establish set times for daily Torah study is guaranteed that he will have success.

He also used to say that on the first night of Shavuot, every Jew should accept upon himself the "yoke" of Torah with his full heart. He should actually express this commitment in words, saying, "Ribono Shel Olam – Master of the Universe, I accept upon myself unconditionally the yoke of Torah."

His [Reyatz’s] son-in-law and successor, the Lubavitcher Rebbe of our generation, taught that it was the custom of all his predecessors as Rebbe to say words of Torah from the Baal Shem Tov and a story about him at the Shavuot Festival meal, and that it is appropriate for everyone follow this custom, in honor of the Baal Shem Tov's yahrtzeit on the first day of Shavuot.

[Based on Lma'an Yishme'u-Shavuot]

Translated-adapted by Rabbi Yerachmiel Tilles from Echyeh v’Asaper. Rabbi Tilles is co-founder of Ascent of Safed, and editor of Ascent Quarterly and the Ascent and Kabbalah Online websites.
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