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The Passover Calendar—2014

The Passover Calendar—2014

An overview of the days of Passover in 2014

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Sunday April 13—13 Nissan

Did you remember to sell your chametz? Your local Chabad rabbi can help, or complete an online “Authorization for the Sale of Chametz” form by clicking here.

Search for the chametz after dark (click here for the exact time). Recite the blessing prior to the search, and the nullification of the chametz (Kol Chamira) following the search. Click here for more information on the search and removal of chametz.

Monday April 14—14 Nissan
The day before Passover

Fast of the Firstborn. For a male firstborn to be exempt from fasting, he must participate in a meal marking the fulfillment of a mitzvah; such a meal is generally held in a synagogue after morning prayers on this day.

Have you sold your chametz? Final call! Your local Chabad rabbi can help, or complete an online “Authorization for the Sale of Chametz” form by clicking here.

Stop eating chametz before the end of the fourth seasonal hour (click here for the exact time).

Burn your remaining (unsold) chametz before the fifth seasonal hour (click here for the exact time).

It is customary to recite the “Order of the Passover Offering” after the afternoon Minchah prayer.

Light the Passover candles, reciting blessings 2 & 4. Click here for the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times. Click here for a summary of the laws of Yom Tov.

According to Chabad custom, complete Hallel is recited during Maariv (evening) services.

First Seder: The Seder contains the observance of many biblical and rabbinical mitzvot, including: eating matzah, eating maror (bitter herbs), drinking four cups of wine, relating the story of the Exodus to our children, reclining as a symbol of freedom, etc. (Click here for a How-To Seder guide.)

To locate a public Seder near you, please click here.

The first night of Passover is referred to as leil shimurim (a night of guarding), based on Exodus 12:42.

Tuesday April 15—15 Nissan
1st day of Passover

Morning service. Full Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Exodus 12:21–51 and Numbers 28:16–25.
Haftorah: Joshua 3:5–7, 5:2–6:1, 6:27.

Beginning with the Musaf Amidah, we recite morid hatal, the prayer for dew, and we omit the prayer for rain. This practice continues until Shemini Atzeret, the day after Sukkot.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

According to Chabad custom, complete Hallel is recited during Maariv evening prayers, followed by the “Counting of the Omer.” We count the 1st day of the Omer. The counting of the Omer is recited during each of the next 49 days, leading up to the holiday of Shavuot on the 50th day. The 49 days embody the 49 steps of self-improvement—beginning with the departure from our “personal” Egypt, until our arrival at Mount Sinai, when we are ready to accept the wisdom of the Torah.

After dark, light candles for the second day of Passover, using an existing flame, and recite blessings 2 & 4. Click here for the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times.

Second Seder: The Seder contains the observance of many biblical and rabbinical mitzvot, including: eating matzah, eating maror (bitter herbs), drinking four cups of wine, relating the story of the Exodus to our children, reclining as a symbol of freedom, etc. (Click here for a How-To Seder guide.)

Wednesday April 16—16 Nissan
2nd day of Passover

Morning service. Full Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Leviticus 22:26–23:44 and Numbers 28:16–25.
Haftorah: II Kings 23:1–9, 21–25.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

After nightfall, count the 2nd day of the Omer, and perform the havdalah ceremony, omitting the blessings on the spices and candle.

Celebrate Passover’s intermediate days. Between now and the last two days of Passover, we may resume much (not all) of our regular workday activities; but, of course, we continue to eat Kosher for Passover foods exclusively. It is customary to drink a glass of wine each day, in celebration of the festival.

Thursday April 17—17 Nissan
3rd day of Passover
1st day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Exodus 13:1-16 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The intermediate days are observed with limited work restrictions.

After nightfall, count the 3rd day of the Omer.

Friday April 18—18 Nissan
4th day of Passover
2nd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Exodus 22:24–23:19 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The intermediate days are observed with limited work restrictions.

Light Shabbat candles and recite blessing 1. Click here for the blessing, and here for local candle-lighting times.

After nightfall, count the 4th day of the Omer.

Festive holiday meal, complete with kiddush.

Shabbat April 19—19 Nissan
5th day of Passover
3rd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)
Torah reading: Exodus 33:12-34:26 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftorah: Ezekiel 37:1-14.

Morning service: Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

Festive holiday meal, complete with kiddush.

Evening prayers and havdalah, including the blessings on the spices and fire, are recited after dark.

After nightfall, count the 5th day of the Omer.

Sunday April 20—20 Nissan
6th day of Passover
4th day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Numbers 9:1–15 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the Intermediate Days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The Intermediate Days are observed with limited work restrictions.

Light candles for the 7th day of Passover, and recite blessing 2. Click here for the blessing, and here for local candle-lighting times.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 6th day of the Omer.

Festive holiday meal, complete with the holiday kiddush.

It is customary in many communities to remain awake all night, studying Torah, in commemoration of the great miracle of the splitting of the sea, which occurred on the 7th day of Passover.

Monday April 21—21 Nissan
7th day of Passover—Shevi’i Shel Pesach

Morning service. Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Exodus 13:17–15:26 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftorah: II Samuel 22:1–51.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 7th day of the Omer.

Light candles after dark for the 8th day of Passover before sunset, using an existing flame, and recite blessing 2. Click here for the blessing, and here for local candle-lighting times.

Festive holiday meal, complete with the holiday kiddush.

Tuesday April 22—22 Nissan
Final Day of Passover—Acharon Shel Pesach

Morning service. Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Deuteronomy 15:19 - 16-17 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftorah: Isaiah 10:32–12:6.

The Yizkor memorial service is recited following the Torah reading.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

On this final day of Passover we strive for the highest level of freedom, and focus on the final redemption. Following the Baal Shem Tov’s custom, we end Passover with “Moshiach’s Feast”—a festive meal complete with matzah and four cups of wine, during which we celebrate the imminent arrival of the Messiah. The feast begins before sunset and continues until after nightfall.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 8th day of the Omer.

After nightfall, perform the havdalah ceremony, omitting the blessings on the spices and the candle.

Nightfall is the official end of Passover (for the exact time, click here). Wait an hour to give the rabbi enough time to buy back your chametz before eating it.

Wednesday April 23—23 Nissan

The day following the holiday is known as Isru Chag. It is forbidden to fast on this day.

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Discussion (66)
April 28, 2014
To Anonymous and Art
The first seder is on the eve of the 15th as Biblically mandated and as established according to the Jewish calendar. The Passover offering was brought on the afternoon of the 14th, but the Seder was held and the holiday of Passover began, on the 15th which is why the Seder is then.
Chabad.org Staff
April 22, 2014
Today at the end off Passover I'm happy and Grateful with G-D thank you all
G-D Bless you ALL
Mauricio
Edmonton.AB.Canada
April 20, 2014
So helpful!
This is so helpful! Thank you so much for posting it and the calendars (day by day) for other holidays too!
Anonymous
April 13, 2014
Passover
My understanding of scripture says in Leviticus 23:


23:5 In the fourteenth day of the first month at even is the LORD's passover.


23:6 And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread.

This is the torah. so, how is that we are saying that Passover begins on the 15th day of Nisan when G-D says that Passover begins on Nisan 14 on the even an the Feast of Unleavened bread begins Nisan 15 on the even?

Can someone please explain this to me? Thanks
Anonymous
April 10, 2014
Passover date time
OOPS ! You are presenting 15 Nisan as Passover day. Why? In Leviticus 23 and other books as well, it is instructed by G-d to be on the 14th. It is very plainly stated to be held, and was held on several places in scripture on the 14th. It does not mean to start at sundown of that day, it means it starts at sundown of the 13th. So why are we doing this on the 15th to the 22nd ?
Art Frailey
Marion, Il
March 31, 2013
Friday night
Indeed we make hamotzi on Shabbat when it falls on Passover, on two whole matzahs.
Chabad.org Staff
mychabad.org
March 28, 2013
Friday Night
Do we make hamotzi on Friday night on 2 pieces of matzah?
Michael
Chicago, IL
March 25, 2013
Happy Passover
Happy Passover to you all
Grace
Gauteng, South Africa
March 23, 2013
Passover in Israel?
Passover in Israel is a very different experience: 1 Sedar, 7 days,.... do you have an guide to help those of us with the transition?
Chag Pesach Sameach!
tzina nechumah
Jerusalem, Israel.
March 21, 2013
clothing
What is appropriate to wear to a Chabad Shul Community Passover dinner?
Anonymous
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