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The Passover Calendar—2017

The Passover Calendar—2017

An overview of the days of Passover in 2017

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Sunday April 9—13 Nissan

Did you remember to sell your chametz? Your local Chabad rabbi can help, or complete an online “Authorization for the Sale of Chametz” form by clicking here.

Search for the chametz after dark (click here for the exact time). Recite the blessing prior to the search, and the nullification of the chametz (Kol Chamira) following the search. Click here for more information on the search and removal of chametz.

Monday April 10—14 Nissan
The day before Passover

Fast of the Firstborn. For a male firstborn to be exempt from fasting, he must participate in a meal marking the fulfillment of a mitzvah; such a meal is generally held in a synagogue after morning prayers on this day.

Have you sold your chametz? Final call! Your local Chabad rabbi can help, or complete an online “Authorization for the Sale of Chametz” form by clicking here.

Stop eating chametz before the end of the fourth seasonal hour (click here for the exact time).

Burn your remaining (unsold) chametz before the fifth seasonal hour (click here for the exact time).

It is customary to recite the “Order of the Passover Offering” after the afternoon Minchah prayer. All Seder items and food for the holiday meals must be prepared before the onset of the holiday.

Light the Passover candles, reciting blessings 2 & 4. Click here for the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times. Click here for a summary of the laws of Yom Tov.

According to Chabad custom, complete Hallel is recited during Maariv (evening) services.

First Seder: The Seder contains the observance of many biblical and rabbinical mitzvot, including: eating matzah, eating maror (bitter herbs), drinking four cups of wine, relating the story of the Exodus to our children, reclining as a symbol of freedom, etc. (Click here for a How-To Seder guide.)

To locate a public Seder near you, please click here.

The first night of Passover is referred to as leil shimurim (a night of guarding), based on Exodus 12:42.

Tuesday April 11—15 Nissan
1st day of Passover

Morning service. Full Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Exodus 12:21–51 and Numbers 28:16–25.
Haftorah: Joshua 3:5–7, 5:2–6:1, 6:27.

Beginning with the Musaf Amidah, we recite morid hatal, the prayer for dew, and we omit the prayer for rain. This practice continues until Shemini Atzeret, the day after Sukkot.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

According to Chabad custom, complete Hallel is recited during Maariv evening prayers, followed by the “Counting of the Omer.” We count the 1st day of the Omer. The counting of the Omer is recited during each of the next 49 days, leading up to the holiday of Shavuot on the 50th day. The 49 days embody the 49 steps of self-improvement—beginning with the departure from our “personal” Egypt, until our arrival at Mount Sinai, when we are ready to accept the wisdom of the Torah.

After dark, light candles for the second day of Passover, using an existing flame, and recite blessings 2 & 4. Click here for the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times.

Second Seder: The Seder contains the observance of many biblical and rabbinical mitzvot, including: eating matzah, eating maror (bitter herbs), drinking four cups of wine, relating the story of the Exodus to our children, reclining as a symbol of freedom, etc. (Click here for a How-To Seder guide.)

Wednesday April 12—16 Nissan
2nd day of Passover

Morning service. Full Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Leviticus 22:26–23:44 and Numbers 28:16–25.
Haftorah: II Kings 23:1–9, 21–25.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

After nightfall, count the 2nd day of the Omer.

Celebrate Passover’s intermediate days. Between now and the last two days of Passover, we may resume much (not all) of our regular workday activities; but, of course, we continue to eat Kosher for Passover foods exclusively. It is customary to drink a glass of wine each day, in celebration of the festival. After evening prayers, perform the havdalah ceremony, omitting the blessings on the spices and candle.

Thursday April 13—17 Nissan
3rd day of Passover
1st day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Exodus 13:1-16 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The intermediate days are observed with limited work restrictions.

After nightfall, count the 3rd day of the Omer.

Friday April 14—18 Nissan
4th day of Passover
2nd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Exodus 22:24–23:19 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The intermediate days are observed with limited work restrictions.

Light candles for the Shabbat and recite blessing 1. Click here for the blessings and here for local candle-lighting times. Shalom Aleichem is recited quietly.

After nightfall, count the 4th day of the Omer.

Shabbat April 15—19 Nissan
5th day of Passover
3rd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)
Torah reading: Exodus 34:1-26 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftorah: Ezekiel 37:1-14.

Morning service: Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. During all of the intermediate days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

Shabbat festive lunch.

In some communities it is customary to read the Song of Songs

After nightfall and evening prayers, count the 5th day of the Omer.

Havdalah.

Sunday April 16—20 Nissan
6th day of Passover
4th day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate days)

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Passover, tefillin are not worn.

Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark. Torah reading: Numbers 9:1-14 and Numbers 28:19–25. The Musaf Amidah is recited. During all of the Intermediate Days, “Yaaleh Veyavo” is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The Intermediate Days are observed with limited work restrictions.

Light candles for the 7th day of Passover, and recite blessing 2. Click here for the blessing, and here for local candle-lighting times.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 6th day of the Omer.

Festive holiday meal, complete with the holiday kiddush.

It is customary in many communities to remain awake all night, studying Torah, in commemoration of the great miracle of the splitting of the sea, which occurred on the 7th day of Passover.

Monday April 17—21 Nissan
7th day of Passover—Shevi’i Shel Pesach

Morning service. Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Exodus 13:17–15:26 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftorah: II Samuel 22:1–51.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 7th day of the Omer.

Light candles for the 8th day of Passover, using an existing flame, and recite blessing 2. Click here for the blessing, and here for local candle-lighting times.

Festive holiday meal, complete with the holiday and Shabbat kiddush.

Tuesday April 18—22 Nissan
Final Day of Passover—Acharon Shel Pesach

Morning service. Half-Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Deuteronomy 14:22-16:17 and Numbers 28:19–25.
Haftorah: Isaiah 10:32–12:6.

The Yizkor memorial service is recited following the Torah reading.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal.

On this final day of Passover we strive for the highest level of freedom, and focus on the final redemption. Following the Baal Shem Tov’s custom, we end Passover with “Moshiach’s Feast”—a festive meal complete with matzah and four cups of wine, during which we celebrate the imminent arrival of the Messiah. The feast begins before sunset and continues until after nightfall.

Evening prayers. After the Amidah, count the 8th day of the Omer.

After nightfall, perform the havdalah ceremony.

Nightfall is the official end of Passover (for the exact time, click here). Wait an hour to give the rabbi enough time to buy back your chametz before eating it.

Wednesday April 19—23 Nissan

The day following the holiday is known as Isru Chag. It is forbidden to fast on this day.

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irma sotelo Elgin, ILL April 15, 2017

Thank you for taking the time to make it simple for me to follow and do. :) Reply

Anonymous Aventura March 19, 2017

No work permitted first 2 and final 2 days of Pesach Dear Michigan friend, work is not permitted on the 17th & 18th. Enjoy! Pesach Sameach❤ Reply

Anonymous Michigan March 19, 2017

Leviticus 23 states that the first and seventh day of Pesach are to be a holy convocation. I want to take the appropriate days off from work. Can someone tell me what days those would be this year? I think it would be April 11, and either the 17th or 18th. Much appreciated! Reply

Yehuda Shurpin for Chabad.org May 13, 2016

Re: Priestly blessing In theory, there really should be the priestly blessing at all other times, not just holidays. The reason for the custom to only do it on holidays is because then people are more joyous and relaxed -even more than a regular shabbat (see Shulchan Aruch Harav 128:57). Based on this, there is no reason NOT to do birchat Cohanim on a holiday which falls on Shabbat.
While it is true that there is a custom that some have not to do Birchat cohanim if it is Shabbat (this has to do with a side issue of immersing in the Mikvah), Almost all are of the opinion it is more correct to do birchat cohanim even if it is Shabbat (see Shulchan Aruch Harav 128:57; Mishna Brurah 128:165 ; Igrot Moshe 3:18, 5:15 ; Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 100:1) Reply

Joel Freeman Australia April 24, 2016

Why in Galut is there the priestly blessing on the first day if Shabbat takes precedence over Chag.

Answer should have references to validate it Reply

Anonymous Miami April 15, 2016

What is the meaning: limited work restrictions Reply

Edgar Craus Canada April 15, 2016

Yizkor candle lighting Thursday or Friday nights Yizkor candle lighting Thursday or Friday nights Reply

Yehuda Shurpin for Chabad.org April 9, 2015

Re: Havdalah The Havdalah on Saturday night that leads into Yom Tov is a combined kiddush and havdalah, so you use a cup of wine/grape juice, and look at the holiday candles for the blessing on the fire. No blessing is made on fragrant spices.
For more on this as well detailed instructions see Holiday Havdalah Reply

Anonymous NY April 8, 2015

havdalah can someone please reply to my post either online or email me ? is the havdalah on shabbat is it like yom tov? or is it shabbat just candle and spices or just cup of grape juice ? i think it is like yom tov but not sure? Reply

Miriam April 3, 2015

Do you light Memorial candles at Passover? Reply

Judith Plit April 2, 2015

Thank you This is so helpful! Reply

David Neely Ohio March 17, 2015

Thanks Thank you so much for your answer. I had no idea that a leap year was taken. I am very glad I found Chabad,org. Reply

Chabad.org Staff March 17, 2015

to David Neely Last year was a leap year on the Jewish calendar, that is why Passover starts relatively early this year. Reply

David Neely Ohio March 16, 2015

I'm confused about the date Why is Passover starting so early in 2015? April 3-10 what happened to the 14th? Reply

Sholom Fairfax, VA via chabadva.org March 10, 2015

Leviticus 23 Re: Leviticus 23 and whether Pesach "starts" on the 14th.

The post from Chabad.org Staff (of April 28, 2014) explains that the Pesach *offering* was indeed the 14th, but the seder starts that night, the 15th of Nisan.

Let me also add, that, in a way, Pesach _does_ start for us on the 14th -- in that the prohibition against eating chametz actually starts on the afternoon of the 14th, rather than that night. Reply

Chabad.org Staff April 28, 2014

To Anonymous and Art The first seder is on the eve of the 15th as Biblically mandated and as established according to the Jewish calendar. The Passover offering was brought on the afternoon of the 14th, but the Seder was held and the holiday of Passover began, on the 15th which is why the Seder is then. Reply

Mauricio Edmonton.AB.Canada April 22, 2014

Today at the end off Passover I'm happy and Grateful with G-D thank you all G-D Bless you ALL Reply

Anonymous April 20, 2014

So helpful! This is so helpful! Thank you so much for posting it and the calendars (day by day) for other holidays too! Reply

Anonymous April 13, 2014

Passover My understanding of scripture says in Leviticus 23:


23:5 In the fourteenth day of the first month at even is the LORD's passover.


23:6 And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread.

This is the torah. so, how is that we are saying that Passover begins on the 15th day of Nisan when G-D says that Passover begins on Nisan 14 on the even an the Feast of Unleavened bread begins Nisan 15 on the even?

Can someone please explain this to me? Thanks Reply

Art Frailey Marion, Il April 10, 2014

Passover date time OOPS ! You are presenting 15 Nisan as Passover day. Why? In Leviticus 23 and other books as well, it is instructed by G-d to be on the 14th. It is very plainly stated to be held, and was held on several places in scripture on the 14th. It does not mean to start at sundown of that day, it means it starts at sundown of the 13th. So why are we doing this on the 15th to the 22nd ? Reply

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