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The Sukkot 2017 Calendar

The Sukkot 2017 Calendar

An overview of Sukkot 5778

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Sunday-Wednesday October 1–4—Tishrei 11–14

As soon as the solemn day of Yom Kippur is behind us, we focus on the traditions of the upcoming holiday of Sukkot. These four days between Yom Kippur and Sukkot are characterized by frenetic activity—purchasing of the Four Kinds, erecting the sukkah hut, inviting guests for the forthcoming holiday, shopping for and preparing all the meals, and purchasing new clothing in honor of the holiday.

Click here for a purchaser’s guide for the Four Kinds.

Click here for a sukkah building guide.

Click here for traditional holiday recipes. 

Wednesday October 4—Tishrei 14
The Day Before Sukkot

It is customary to bind together the Four Kinds—the lulav, hadassim and aravot—today, while in the sukkah. Click here to learn how.

Since the festival begins on a Wednesday night, we prepare an eruv tavshilin.

On the day before Sukkot it is traditional to give extra charity, for true joy is sharing with others.

Women and girls light candles—preferably in the sukkah—in order to usher in the holiday. Click here for the text of the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times. Click here for a summary of the laws of Yom Tov. Click here for a digest of the laws of dwelling in the sukkah.

After evening prayers, we enjoy a holiday meal. Even if it is pouring rain, on this night it is a mitzvah to at least make kiddush and eat an ounce of challah in the sukkah. We dip the challah in honey.

The group of supernal guests—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David—who grace our sukkahs throughout the holiday (known as ushpizin) are tonight and tomorrow led by our Patriarch Abraham. The chassidic entourage of ushpizin—consisting of the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash, the Rebbe Rashab and the Rebbe Rayatz—is led by the Baal Shem Tov.

Tonight begins the Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah celebrations. It is customary to dance and sing in commemoration of the water-drawing festivals held nightly in the Holy Temple throughout the holiday of Sukkot. Click here for more on Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah.

Thursday October 5—Tishrei 15
1st day of Sukkot

We shake the Four Kinds. Click here for a how-to guide.

Morning service. Full Hallel is recited, followed by the Hoshanot (circling of the synagogue’s reading table with the Four Kinds, while reciting special prayers petitioning G‑d for ample livelihood in the coming year).
Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Leviticus 22:26–23:44 and Numbers 29:12–16.
Haftorah: Zechariah 14:1–21.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal in the sukkah. We dip the challah in honey.

After dark, women and girls light candles—preferably in the sukkah—for the second day of Sukkot, using an existing flame. Click here for the text of the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times.

After evening prayers, a festive holiday meal in the sukkah. We dip the challah in honey.

The group of supernal guests—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David—who grace our sukkahs throughout the holiday (known as ushpizin) are tonight and tomorrow led by our Patriarch Isaac. The chassidic entourage of ushpizin—consisting of the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash, the Rebbe Rashab and the Rebbe Rayatz—is led by the Maggid of Mezeritch.

Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah celebrations continue. It is customary to dance and sing in commemoration of the water-drawing festivals held nightly in the Holy Temple throughout the holiday of Sukkot. Click here for more on Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah.

Friday October 6—Tishrei 16
2nd Day of Sukkot

We shake the Four Kinds. Click here for a how-to guide.

Morning service. Full Hallel is recited, followed by the Hoshanot (circling of the synagogue’s reading table with the Four Kinds, while reciting special prayers petitioning G‑d for ample livelihood in the coming year).
Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Leviticus 22:26–23:44 and Numbers 29:12–16.
Haftorah: I Kings 8:2–21.

The priests bless the congregation with the priestly blessing during the Musaf prayer.

Festive lunch meal in the sukkah. We dip the challah in honey.

Afternoon prayers.

If you performed an eruv tavshilin on Wednesday, cook the foods necessary for Shabbat, using a flame that has been lit from the onset of the holiday.

18 minutes before sunset, women and girls light candles -- preferably in the sukkah -- for Shabbat, using an existing flame. Click here for the text of the blessing, and here for local candle lighting times.

After abridged Shabbat evening prayers (with the addition of the Yaaleh Veyavo insert in the Amidah) festive Shabbat meal in the sukkah.

The group of supernal guests—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David -- who grace our sukkahs throughout the holiday (known as ushpizin) are tonight and tomorrow led by our Patriarch Jacob. The chassidic entourage of ushpizin—consisting of the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash, the Rebbe Rashab and the Rebbe Rayatz—is led by the Alter Rebbe.

Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah celebrations continue. It is customary to dance and sing in commemoration of the water-drawing festivals held nightly in the Holy Temple throughout the holiday of Sukkot. And now that the holiday has concluded, the festivities are often accompanied by live music. Click here for more on Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah.

Celebrate Sukkot’s Chol Hamoed (“intermediate days”). Between now and Shemini Atzeret, we may resume much (not all) of our regular, workday activities (not on Shabbat), but, of course, we continue to eat in the sukkah. It is customary to drink a glass of wine each day, in celebration of the festival. Click here for a digest of the laws of Chol Hamoed.

Shabbat October 7—Tishrei 17
3rd day of Sukkot
Chol Hamoed

We do not take the Four Kinds today in observance of Shabbat.

Morning service: Normal Shabbat prayers, with the addition of the Yaaleh Veyavo insert in the Amidah.
Complete Hallel is recited. Two Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Exodus 33:12–34:26 and Numbers 29:17–22.
Haftorah: Ezekiel 38:18-39:15.

Holiday Musaf amidah.

Afternoon prayers. Evening prayers. After nightfall, perform the Havdalah ceremony.

The group of supernal guests—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David—who grace our sukkahs throughout the holiday (known as ushpizin) are tonight and tomorrow led by Moses. The chassidic entourage of ushpizin—consisting of the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash, the Rebbe Rashab and the Rebbe Rayatz—is led by the Mitteler Rebbe.

Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah celebrations continue. It is customary to dance and sing in commemoration of the water-drawing festivals held nightly in the Holy Temple throughout the holiday of Sukkot.Click here for more on Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah. Click here for a Sukkot event in your location.

Sunday October 8—Tishrei 18
4th day of Sukkot
2nd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate day)

We shake the Four Kinds. Click here for a how-to guide.

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Sukkot, tefillin are not worn.
Full Hallel is recited, followed by the Hoshanot (circling of the synagogue’s reading table with the Four Kinds, while reciting special prayers petitioning G‑d for ample livelihood in the coming year). We say today’s section of Hoshanot.
One Torah scroll is taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Numbers 29:20–28.

The Musaf amidah is recited. During all of the intermediate days, Yaaleh Veyavo is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

Chol Hamoed (the “intermediate days”) are observed with limited work restriction. Click here for a digest of the laws of Chol Hamoed.

The group of supernal guests—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David—who grace our sukkahs throughout the holiday (known as ushpizin) are tonight and tomorrow led by Aaron the high priest. The chassidic entourage of ushpizin—consisting of the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash, the Rebbe Rashab and the Rebbe Rayatz—is led by the Tzemach Tzedek.

Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah celebrations continue. It is customary to dance and sing in commemoration of the water-drawing festivals held nightly in the Holy Temple throughout the holiday of Sukkot. Click here for more on Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah. Click here for a Sukkot event in your location.

Monday October 9—Tishrei 19
5th day of Sukkot
3rd day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate day)

We shake the Four Kinds. Click here for a how-to guide.

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Sukkot, tefillin are not worn.
Full Hallel is recited, followed by the Hoshanot (circling of the synagogue’s reading table with the Four Kinds, while reciting special prayers petitioning G‑d for ample livelihood in the coming year).
One Torah scroll is taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Numbers 29:23–31.

The Musaf amidah is recited. During all of the Intermediate Days, Yaaleh Veyavo is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

Chol Hamoed (the “intermediate days”) are observed with limited work restriction. Click here for a digest of the laws of Chol Hamoed.

The group of supernal guests—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David—who grace our sukkahs throughout the holiday (known as ushpizin) are tonight and tomorrow led by Joseph. The chassidic entourage of ushpizin—consisting of the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash, the Rebbe Rashab and the Rebbe Rayatz—is led by the Rebbe Maharash.

Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah celebrations continue. It is customary to dance and sing in commemoration of the water-drawing festivals held nightly in the Holy Temple throughout the holiday of Sukkot. Click here for more on Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah. Click here for a Sukkot event in your location.

Tuesday October 10—Tishrei 20
6th day of Sukkot
4th day Chol Hamoed

We shake the Four Kinds. Click here for a how-to guide.

Holiday Musaf amidah is recited.

During all of the Intermediate Days, Yaaleh Veyavo is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

The group of supernal guests—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David -- who grace our sukkahs throughout the holiday (known as ushpizin) are tonight and tomorrow led by King David. The chassidic entourage of ushpizin—consisting of the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash, the Rebbe Rashab and the Rebbe Rayatz—is led by the Rebbe Rashab.

Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah celebrations continue. It is customary to dance and sing in commemoration of the water-drawing festivals held nightly in the Holy Temple throughout the holiday of Sukkot. Click here for more on Simchat Beit Hasho’eivah. Click here for a Sukkot event in your location.

Tonight and tomorrow is Hoshana Rabbah. It is customary in many communities to remain awake all night. It is traditional to recite the Book of Deuteronomy before midnight, and the Book of Psalms after midnight.

Wednesday October 11—Tishrei 21
7th day of Sukkot
5th day of Chol Hamoed (intermediate day)
Hoshana Rabbah

We shake the Four Kinds. Click here for a how-to guide.

Morning service: In many communities, throughout the intermediate days of Sukkot, tefillin are not worn.
Before Hallel, we remove the upper two bands from the lulav. Full Hallel is recited, followed by the Hoshanot (circling of the synagogue’s reading table with the Four Kinds, while reciting special prayers petitioning G‑d for ample livelihood in the coming year). During today’s Hoshanot we circle the reading table seven times, followed by several pages of special prayers, wherein we ask G‑d to bless us with abundant rain. At the conclusion of the Hoshanot we take a bundle of five willows, and with it we strike the ground five times.
One Torah scroll is taken out of the ark.
Torah reading: Numbers 29:26–34.

The Musaf amidah is recited. During all of the intermediate days, Yaaleh Veyavo is inserted during all prayers and in the Grace After Meals.

Chol Hamoed (the “intermediate days”) are observed with limited work restrictions. Click here for a digest of the laws of Chol Hamoed.

Many have the custom to eat kreplach—ground beef- or chicken-filled dough, folded into triangles—on this day. Click here for a recipe. These are usually eaten during the festive lunch meal, during which one also washes over challah or bread.

Click here for more about Hoshana Rabbah.

Tonight is Shemini Atzeret.

Since the festival begins on a Wednesday night, we prepare an eruv tavshilin.

Women and girls light candles—preferably in the sukkah—in order to usher in the holiday. Click here for the text of the blessings, and here for local candle-lighting times.

Please refer to our Shemini Atzeret/Simchat Torah Calendar for further instructions.

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PHILIP KADISH TEANECK October 11, 2017

Today is Wednesday October 11th. Are you allowed to make phone calls today before sundown? Reply

Chabad.org Staff October 11, 2017
in response to PHILIP KADISH:

Yes Reply

Deanna Bergen county n.j October 11, 2017

I have an observant customer. I service their plants every other week. This week, weds 10/11 is the nex. A I allowed to go? Reply

Rabbi Yossi Grossbaum, for Chabad.org Folsom, CA October 16, 2017
in response to Deanna:

Sorry for missing this and not responding in time. If another time after the holiday would not work for some reason, since it was still the intermediate days of the holiday, it would have been fine for you to go and service your clients plants on Wednesday 10/11. I hope that it all worked out in the end. Reply

Anonymous CO September 30, 2017

These are not mere traditions of men.These are Gods Holy appointed times forever,for anyone who follows Him Reply

Geoff Robinson Fort Collins, CO October 12, 2017
in response to Anonymous:

Thanks for the way you put that. Men's traditions can be good or bad, helpful or onerous. Men's traditions can be debated or changed, but we need to show enough care to do what G_d tells us in Torah! Torah is not as hard as man's traditions. Our hearts should chase His instruction. Reply

Anonymous cape Town SA September 15, 2013

Very useful Reply

Marlene new york , new york August 24, 2010

nice summary of what to do in Sukkot I found this useful, you probably know all of it but for me it was nice summary. Reply

Anonymous south east london,bromley October 16, 2017
in response to Marlene:

This web page is amazing i love what is put on this page i think that this page is one of my best pages. it says for sukkot that we are suppose to make the kreplach in squares why is that because the most people make there kreplach in any shape. Reply