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The Text of Al Chet

The Text of Al Chet

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(The "Al Chet" confession of sins is said ten times in the course of the Yom Kippur services: Following the Amidah of the afternoon prayers of the day before Yom Kippur; just before sunset on Yom Kippur Eve; and twice during each of the following services--the evening service of yom Kippur eve, and the morning service, the Musaf service and the afternoon service of Yom Kippur day--once at the end of the Silent Amidah, and once during the cantor's repitition of the Amidah.)

For the sin which we have committed before You under duress or willingly.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by hard-heartedness.

For the sin which we have committed before You inadvertently.

And for the sin which we have committed before You with an utterance of the lips.

For the sin which we have committed before You with immorality.

And for the sin which we have committed before You openly or secretly.

For the sin which we have committed before You with knowledge and with deceit.

And for the sin which we have committed before You through speech.

For the sin which we have committed before You by deceiving a fellowman.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by improper thoughts.

For the sin which we have committed before You by a gathering of lewdness.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by verbal [insincere] confession.

For the sin which we have committed before You by disrespect for parents and teachers.

And for the sin which we have committed before You intentionally or unintentionally.

For the sin which we have committed before You by using coercion.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by  desecrating the Divine Name.

For the sin which we have committed before You by impurity of  speech.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by foolish  talk.

For the sin which we have committed before You with the evil  inclination.

And for the sin which we have committed before You knowingly or unknowingly.

For all these, God of pardon, pardon us, forgive us, atone for us. 

For the sin which we have committed before You by false denial and lying.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by a bribe-taking or a bribe-giving hand.

For the sin which we have committed before You by scoffing.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by evil talk  [about another].

For the sin which we have committed before You in business  dealings. 

And for the sin which we have committed before You by eating  and drinking.

For the sin which we have committed before You by [taking or  giving] interest and by usury.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by a haughty demeanor. 

For the sin which we have committed before You by the prattle of our lips. 

And for the sin which we have committed before You by a glance of the eye.

For the sin which we have committed before You with proud looks.

And for the sin which we have committed before You with impudence.

 For all these, God of pardon, pardon us, forgive us, atone for us. 

For the sin which we have committed before You by casting off the yoke [of Heaven].

And for the sin which we have committed before You in passing judgment.

For the sin which we have committed before You by scheming against a fellowman. 

And for the sin which we have committed before You by a begrudging eye. 

For the sin which we have committed before You by frivolity.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by obduracy.

For the sin which we have committed before You by running to do evil.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by tale-bearing.

For the sin which we have committed before You by swearing in vain. 

And for the sin which we have committed before You by causeless hatred.

For the sin which we have committed before You by embezzlement.

And for the sin which we have committed before You by a confused heart.

 For all these, God of pardon, pardon us, forgive us, atone for us. 

And for the sins for which we are obligated to bring a burnt-offering. 

And for the sins for which we are obligated to bring a sin-offering.

And for the sins for which we are obligated to bring a varying offering [according to one's means].

And for the sins for which we are obligated to bring a guilt-offering for a certain or doubtful trespass. 

And for the sins for which we incur the penalty of lashing for rebelliousness. 

And for the sins for which we incur the penalty of forty lashes.

And for the sins for which we incur the penalty of death by the hand of Heaven. 

And for the sins for which we incur the penalty of excision and childlessness. 

And for the sins for which we incur the penalty of the four forms of capital punishment executed by the Court: stoning, burning, decapitation and strangulation. 

For [transgressing] positive and prohibitory mitzvot, whether [the prohibitions] can be rectified by a specifically prescribed act or not, those of which we are aware and those of which we are not aware; those of which we are aware, we have already declared them before You and confessed them to You, and those of which we are not aware --- before You they are revealed and known, as it is stated:The hidden things belong to the Lord our God, but the revealed things are for us and for our children forever, that we may carry out all the words of this Torah. ForYou are the Pardoner of Israel and the Forgiver of the tribes of Yeshurun in every generation, and aside from You we have no King who forgives and pardons.

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Adrienne Pompano beach January 1, 2017

Thank you Reply

Anonymous Athens, Greece October 12, 2016

Thank you Reply

Anonymous Florida October 11, 2016

There is much in me to forgive and I am thankful for this time to do so. To be clean and to start life this year fresh and new. To find forgiveness for the sins I can recognize and for those I'm not aware of. I want to do much better this year. If I keep practicing I know one day soon I'll get it right. Reply

Anonymous August 21, 2016

Thank you! Just what I was looking for! Reply

sandy w Los Angeles September 24, 2015

The AMIDAH, our silent prayer, brings me closer to G-D than almost any prayer I can recall. It is my time to seek favor with the Almighty for my family and loved ones. Avinu Malkeinu and the Al Chait are treasures of prayer and humility before our maker, and can only bring joy to those who celebrate, regardless of religion. Reply

Anonymous Hackensack September 23, 2015

Thank you for having this on line. I'm not affiliated with any congregation by choice nevertheless I love my heritage and traditions and connection to my G-d. On Yom Kippur I remember all the loved ones who have passed. I remember those who supported the Shul I went to as a child, where I learned Hebrew and Biblical History of our spiritual nation. "[ I ] carry it where ever I go, on my gates, and for front-lets ..." I treasure the walks with my mother on the slate sidewalk shining in the sun on our way to Yom Kippur services. Forever in my heart are the memories of bringing gladiola flowers to my grandmother and spending the day with her and grandpa. Homemade clear chicken soup. Challah wine herring ..guests coming by and grandpa heading off to synagogue. And many more memories of growing up Jewish and keeping tradition. Reply

Anonymous Florida October 4, 2014

Unable to attend services. This prayer helped me get thru a difficult time today. I have renewed my love and faith as a person and a Jew. Reply

Olaf Schroeder September 13, 2013

Like many confessions, the "we" is a public declaration of the truth that all have sinned. Within the "we", there is still the implicit declaration that "I" have sinned. Upon further reflection you may find out "when did I embezzle?" and find you need look no further than the "office pen" that made its way home but never returned. Reply

Barbara Jackson September 7, 2013

Extremely grateful for this document. Will remember it forever. Reply

Ken Crawford Mayfield, KY September 26, 2012

To my Jewish brothers, have a great and holy Yom Kippur! I am Catholic, but worship the One true Lord of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. I will now use this wonderful prayer as I examine my own conscience as I seek God's forgiveness. A humble and contrite heart give me, O Lord. Amen. Reply

Poli Garanhuns, Pernambuco September 25, 2012

Thank you so much for sharing this with us! Reply

Anonymous Walnut Creek, CA September 24, 2012

Thank you for sending me this. Thank you for all you do. Reply

Irwin Mann Irvington, NJ September 19, 2012

IAl Chet is my favorite religious document. It demands the most of us, to make us change. It makes us confront our weakness most. Socrates would have loved it because it makes us examine our lves more than anything.0% theory 100% practice. As Moses said today I give you a blessing and a curse. It's entirely up to you. Reply

Anonymous North HIlls, CA September 8, 2012

The prayer is a communal prayer said aloud on the day of Yom Kippur.

There is also a time for personal silent prayer. The public prayer is supposed to cover many areas and is a communal prayer for repentence. You may not have done all of the things in the list but surely you have done one of them.

We ask for attonement as a community, in a way we are asking our neighbor to be forgiven as well. Reply

Anonymous Pittsburgh, PA/USA August 15, 2012

I am just reading the prayer above and I am sorry, but I do not understand how a person can be forgiven for generalities as these are stated and with the pronoun "we". A person can't say they are sorry for a generality, but only for a specific . . "I" am sorry for having done ___ or having said ____ or one of neglect. Even King David confessed "his" sin and took ownership of it. I am not Jewish, so I assume I am missing something with this and would appreciate if someone would explain. Reply

Anonymous NYC October 9, 2011

The exact text of the Al Chet is not found in the Bible, it was composed by the rabbis of later generations. It can be found in the Yom Kippur prayerbook. Reply

Toluhi Michael Lagos, Nigeria October 8, 2011

Just to say thanks for such a broad spectrum prayer, covering virtually all possible areas of our daily failings, in our duties to GOD and our fellow being. I find it very soul searching, and edifying too.
Thanks Reply

Anonymous Atibaia, São Paulo October 7, 2011

Please, could you tell me where I find the Al Chet in the old Testament? What book and what chapiter? I 'll be grateful to you! Sorry for my faults in English. I'm from Brazil . I hope to have made myself understood. Thanks in advance.Eli Reply

reva BROOKLYN, NEW YORK October 7, 2011

I cannot even tell u how much chabad.org has been enhancing my holidays!! Thank u so much!! U are just amazing!! Keep on inspriring people w ith all ur work!! Reply

rachel miami, florida October 14, 2010

Words cannot describe... thank you all so very much. I have been so touched with your compassion and wisdom and understanding of the pain and guilt I was feeling. When I read the responses, they were not ones of condemnation but of love and forgiveness... If you all in your "human nature" can do this, then how much more will my Father in Heaven love and forgive me. After all the support, thiis New Year I have been forgiven and even "forgiven myself" ... now I pray to remain refreshed in my "newness". I love my God and will try never to hurt Him again. Thank you all for helping to keep me on the right track. I am alive for it today. Thank you Chabad.org,
Love and Blessings, Reply

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