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Westborough, MA 01581 | change

Sunday, February 26, 2017

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Calendar for: Chabad of Westborough 54 South Street, Westborough, MA 01581   |   Contact Info
Rosh Chodesh Adar
Halachic Times (Zmanim)
Times for Westborough, MA 01581
4:58 AM
Dawn (Alot Hashachar):
5:36 AM
Earliest Tallit and Tefillin (Misheyakir):
6:26 AM
Sunrise (Hanetz Hachamah):
9:10 AM
Latest Shema:
10:07 AM
Latest Shacharit:
11:59 AM
Midday (Chatzot Hayom):
12:28 PM
Earliest Mincha (Mincha Gedolah):
3:17 PM
Mincha Ketanah (“Small Mincha”):
4:27 PM
Plag Hamincha (“Half of Mincha”):
5:33 PM
Sunset (Shkiah):
6:02 PM
Nightfall (Tzeit Hakochavim):
11:58 PM
Midnight (Chatzot HaLailah):
56:15 min.
Shaah Zmanit (proportional hour):
Jewish History

The 30th of Shevat is celebrated by the descendents of Rabbi Yomtov Lipman Heller (1579-1654) as a day of thanksgiving, for his liberation and restoration after his imprisonment in Vienna in 1629.

Rabbi Yomtov Lipman was one of the important rabbinical figures of the early 17th century. Known as the "Tosfos Yomtov" after his commentary on the Mishnah by that name, he also authored important commentaries on the Rosh and other rabbinical works. A disciple of the famed Maharal of Prague, Rabbi Yomtov Lipman was appointed, at the tender age of 18, to serve as a dayan (rabbinical judge) in in that city. He subsequently filled a number of prestigious rabbinical positions, including rabbi of Nikolsburg and of Vienna. In 1627 he was recalled to Prague to serve as the city's chief rabbi.

That position earned him powerful enemies when he refused to follow the dictates of Prague's rich and influential citizens and strove to relieve the burden imposed on the poor by the suffocating "crown taxes" imposed on the Jews. His enemies informed on him to the government, falsely accusing him of treason. In 1629, Rabbi Yomtov Lipman was arrested, tried and sentenced to death. The Jewish communities of Bohemia succeeded in having the sentence commuted and reduced to a heavy fine, and raised the funds for the payment of the first installment that secured his release. However, his enemies obtained an imperial decision that he could not officiate as rabbi in any town of the empire, leaving him homeless and destitute. It took many years for him to pay off the balance of the fine and be restored to his former position. It was only in the winter of 1644, when he settled in Krakow after being appointed chief rabbi of the city, that he felt that that he could celebrate his release and restoration.

Shevat 30th (the 1st day of Rosh Chodesh Adar)--the day that Rabbi Yomtov Lipman assumed the rabbinate of Krakow--was celebrated by him and his family as a day of thanksgiving to G-d. Rabbi Yomtov Lipman asked that future generations continue to mark the date, and the custom is upheld by his descendants to this day.

Links:
The Tosfot Yomtov

Laws and Customs

Today is the first of the two Rosh Chodesh ("Head of the Month") days for the month of Adar (when a month has 30 days, both the last day of the month and the first day of the following month serve as the following month's Rosh Chodesh).

Special portions are added to the daily prayers: Hallel (Psalms 113-118) is recited -- in its "partial" form -- following the Shacharit morning prayer, and the Yaaleh V'yavo prayer is added to the Amidah and to Grace After Meals; the additional Musaf prayer is said (when Rosh Chodesh is Shabbat, special additions are made to the Shabbat Musaf). Tachnun (confession of sins) and similar prayers are omitted.

Many have the custom to mark Rosh Chodesh with a festive meal and reduced work activity. The latter custom is prevalent amongst women, who have a special affinity with Rosh Chodesh -- the month being the feminine aspect of the Jewish Calendar.

Links: The 29th Day; The Lunar Files

Daily Thought

“I was in the midst of the exile, on the river of Kevar.” (Ezekiel 1:1)

(Kevar is the Hebrew word for “already.”)


At the onset of the exile, Ezekiel sat on the bank of a river called “I heard that already.”

It is a river so cold, it can make icicles from fiery sparks of wisdom.

It is a river so putrid, the most wondrous secrets become there old and rotten.

It is a river of exile. Because it is a lie.

Wisdom never says, “I heard that already.”

If you had truly heard, if you had absorbed this wisdom deep within your soul until it meant everything to you, you would hear the newness of it each time you heard it again.

Torat Menachem 5751, vol. 1, page 330.