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Apple Turnovers

Apple Turnovers

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I've decided to go simple with these Rosh Hashanah apple turnovers. The pastry is pre-made, so you're not doing much more than dicing up some apples and assembling them.


Apples are one of the sweet foods that we eat on Rosh Hashanah to symbolize our hope that G‑d will make the coming year a sweet one for us. But there is another layer to why we eat apple specifically, when so many fruits are sweet, which you can read about here.

Two tips for this recipe:

  1. Soak the raisins in some warm water. This helps them rehydrate and plump up. (Details in the instructions below.)
  2. Leave the puff pastry out for about five minutes to defrost just enough that it is pliable, but do not let it become too soft—it will be difficult to work with.


Ingredients

  • 12 puff pastry squares (5x5 inches each)
  • 3 granny smith apples
  • ⅔ cup sugar
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt (if you're using table salt, use ¼-½ tsp. instead)
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • optional: ½ cup raisins
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 2¼ cups confectioners sugar
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice

Directions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 400°F (200°C).
  2. Place the raisins in a bowl and cover with hot water.
  3. Whisk together the sugar, cinnamon, and salt.
  4. Dice the apples and toss with the sugar mixture.
  5. Spread the puff pastry squares out on a piece of parchment paper and leave to defrost until it is pliable but not too soft (about 4-5 minutes).
  6. Drain the raisins and add to the apple mixture. Squeeze in the lemon juice.
  7. Spoon the apple mixture into the center of each piece of puff pastry. Choose two opposite corners and bring them together. Pinch the seams to form a triangle shape. Seal well.
  8. Transfer the turnovers to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  9. Beat the egg and brush over the turnovers.
  10. Bake at 400°F for 20-25 minutes, until golden.
  11. Allow turnovers to cool.
  12. To make the glaze, sift the confectioners sugar into a bowl. Add the water and lemon juice, and whisk until smooth. When the turnovers have cooled, drizzle with glaze.

Note: To freeze, make and assemble the turnovers. Freeze flat on a baking sheet, then transfer (once frozen solid) to a zip-top bag. Bake fresh.

Yields: 12 turnovers



Miriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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Cassandra September 17, 2017

Looks great! After first day, should they be kept in fridge or room temperature ok? Thanks Reply

Karen Pennsylvania September 13, 2017

Miriam: Thank you for this recipe! Anything apple is a real delight in Life, because we are the Apple of YHVH's eye! He cares for us! Awesome. Reply

Yankeleh Gilead Eastern Thailand September 12, 2017

apple turnovers Dear Miriam, these apple turnovers look so delicious. My regret is that I cannot easily make them here in my boonie area in Eastern Thailand. I feel like printing out your recipe and eating that instead. I probably could make them if I could make puffed pastry dough easily. Pity. Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 13, 2017
in response to Yankeleh Gilead:

Hi Yankeleh,

Real puff pastry is notoriously time-consuming and finicky, but there is something called "rough puff" that you could try making. I don't have a specific recipe to recomend, but you'll find lots online. You could also use several layers of filo pastry if that's more available. Reply

Anonymous New YOrk September 13, 2017
in response to Yankeleh Gilead:

If the market has them, you can use wonton wrappers. The dough is not as flaky but the result is just as delic. Reply

Anne Wise Cincinnati September 12, 2017

Miriam, can these be made ahead of time? Or should they be made closer to Yom Tov? Are they freezable? Would it be better to freeze raw and then bake on Erev Yom Tov? Looks amazing cant wait to try it. Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 13, 2017
in response to Anne Wise:

Hi Anne,

You can definitely prepare these in advance. I would assemble them and freeze raw, then stick in the oven on erev yom tov. Enjoy! Reply

Mushka Brooklyn September 11, 2017

8.Transfer the turnovers to a baking sheet lined with puff pastry.

I'm assuming the last 2 words ar meant to be parchment paper? Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 11, 2017
in response to Mushka:

Oops, my apologies, yes, I meant parchment paper.

I've amended the text to read correctly. Thank you. Reply

Tzip September 11, 2017
in response to Miriam Szokovski:

I plan to make these as my birthday treat for work. But I think I'll practice first ;). Thanks!! Reply

Ann via shalomchabad.com September 10, 2017

Looks delicious! I can't wait to try it! Reply

Tzip September 10, 2017

Is it a typo to line the pan with puff pastry? Is it perhaps parchment? I want to make these and not having to make the crust is a plus! :). Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 11, 2017
in response to Tzip :

Oops, my apologies, yes, I meant parchment paper.

I've amended the text to read correctly. Thank you. Reply

Anonymous September 10, 2017

Also impressed that there's no added oil. I suppose you could even adjust sugar content according to preference as well, possibly making some with the glaze and some without, to accommodate everyone's holiday eating pleasure. Reply

Miriam Szokovski September 10, 2017
in response to Anonymous:

Absolutely. You could definitely cut down the sugar in the apple mixture. You could also just dust them with confectioners sugar instead of using the glaze, which would be much less sweet. Reply

Cook It Kosher features recipes from Chabad.org food blogger Miriam Szokovski, as well as guest bloggers and cookbook authors. Let us know if you’d like to contribute!
Miriam SzokovskiMiriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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