Less than a week until Seder night means it’s definitely time to start thinking about the Seder plate foods, including charoset—a mixture of apples, nuts and wine which resembles the mortar and brick made by the Jews when they toiled for Pharaoh. This is used as a type of relish into which the maror (bitter herb) is dipped (and then shaken off) before eating.

Click here to learn more about the meaning behind charoset.


The base of any charoset is sweet apple and/or pear, walnuts and red wine. Fruit—small dice, large dice or grated, that’s up to you. Nuts chopped or ground—again, up to you. It’s a matter of taste. Can’t decide? Make a few versions and have a vote.


Some people like to add dried fruit like raisins, dates, prunes or apricots, and spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves or allspice. Desiccated coconut can add another layer of texture, and is a good alternative for the nut-allergic.


I’ve got four variations for you here, but feel free to play around and come up with your own.

Simple Chabad-Style Charoset


  • 1 red apple
  • 1 pear
  • 1 cup chopped or ground walnuts
  • ½ cup sweet red wine

Peel and finely dice the apple and pear. Mix in the ground nuts and wine. Refrigerate until serving. Add a little more wine immediately before serving.


Chunky Charoset


  • 1 apple
  • 1 pear
  • 1 cup chopped or ground walnuts
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ½ cup sweet red wine
  • ¼ tsp. cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg

Peel and finely dice the apple and pear. Mix in the ground nuts, raisins, wine and spices. Refrigerate until serving. Add a little more wine immediately before serving.


Smooth Charoset


Use any of these recipes and pulse in a food processor until it reaches a thick paste consistency.


Nut-Free Charoset


  • 1 apple
  • 1 pear
  • 1 cup desiccated coconut
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ½ cup sweet red wine

Peel and finely dice the apple and pear. Mix in the rest of the ingredients. Refrigerate until serving. Add a little more wine immediately before serving.


There’s one major “problem” with charoset—it’s customary to shake the charoset off the maror before eating, but the charoset is quite delicious! So, set some charoset aside in a separate container for later use. Mix it into your breakfast yogurt, or serve warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

What kind of charoset will you be making for Passover? Got a special family recipe? Leave a comment and share it with us!