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Traditional Chanukah Potato Latkes

Traditional Chanukah Potato Latkes

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I recently realized that while I've shared my recipes for corn latkes, butternut squash sweet potato latkes, vegetable latkes and beet latkes stuffed with goat cheese, I've never shared my traditional potato recipe.


You'll need onion, oil, salt, potatoes, eggs, flour and oil. While the recipe works with any type of potato, using Yukon Gold will be much more aesthetically pleasing because they discolor much more slowly than other potatoes and will keep your mixture looking bright and fresh for longer. They also have a buttery taste which will take your latkes to the next level.


Most latke recipes call for raw onion, but I like to fry them off first to give the latkes more flavor. Dice the onion and sauté it in 2 tbsp. oil and 1 tsp. salt until golden.

Peel and grate the potatoes (by hand or with a food processor) and immediately put the potato shreds into a bowl of cold water. Continue shredding until all the potatoes are grated.

Place the eggs, flour, fried onion and 2 tsp. salt in a separate bowl. Drain the grated potato well, add it to the rest of the ingredients and mix immediately.

Heat 2-4 tbsp. of oil in a frying pan, over medium heat. Test the oil by dropping a tiny bit of the mixture into the pan. When the oil sizzles upon contact, it is ready.

TIP: Add a small piece of carrot to the oil you're frying in. When the carrot starts to looks shriveled and brown, replace it with a fresh piece. The carrot helps absorb the burnt taste from the oil, and you can keep frying for longer without changing the oil.


For uniform latkes, use a 1/4 or 1/8 cup measuring cup. Scoop the batter and gently drop it into the oil. Press down gently with the back of the measuring cup to flatten. Fry 2-3 minutes until golden, then flip the latkes and fry 1-2 minutes on the second side. Repeat until all the mixture has been fried. (You will need to add more oil to the pan every couple of batches.)


Latkes taste best fresh, but if you need to make them in advance, I recommend reheating them in a frying pan with a tiny bit of oil to help them crisp up again.


Looking for a gluten free potato latke recipe? Try this one.

Ingredients:

  • ½ an onion
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • 3 tsp. kosher salt, divided
  • 1.5 lbs. Yukon Gold potatoes
  • 2 eggs
  • ¼ cup flour
  • Oil for frying

Directions:

  1. Dice the onion and sauté it in 2 tbsp. oil and 1 tsp. salt until golden.
  2. Grate the potatoes (by hand or in a food processor). Immediately transfer the grated potato to a bowl of cold water.
  3. Place the eggs, flour, fried onion and 2 tsp. salt in a separate bowl. Drain the grated potato well, add it to the rest of the ingredients and mix immediately.
  4. Heat 2-4 tbsp. of oil in a frying pan, over medium heat. Test the oil by dropping a tiny bit of the mixture into the pan. When the oil sizzles upon contact, it is ready.
  5. For uniform latkes, use a 1/4 or 1/8 cup measuring cup. Scoop the batter and gently drop it into the oil. Press down gently with the back of the measuring cup to flatten. Fry 2-3 minutes until golden, then flip the latkes and fry 1-2 minutes on the second side. Repeat until all the mixture has been fried. (You will need to add more oil to the pan every couple of batches.)

Yields: 16 latkes


I know some people are staunch apple sauce and sour cream latke-eaters, but I've never really been able to wrap my mind (or taste-buds) around either of those. I prefer my latkes straight up.

What's your latke condiment of choice?


Miriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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Paul Yazdani Bel Air December 29, 2016

Thanks I love the idea of frying the onions first. It made the end result much more intensely flavored. Reply

Miriam Szokovski December 28, 2016

gluten free if you click on the link it will take you to the gluten free recipe. Reply

Nan Sacramento, CA December 28, 2016

Difference between gluten free and regular latkes I read the recipe and was wondering what the difference is between the regular latke recipe and the gluten free recipe; they appear to be the same...? Reply

M. Diane Flushing, NY December 27, 2016

i like them best when they are naturally sweet (potato) and straight up (no dressing).They look beautiful that way and taste so natural and yummy! Reply

Emma Guzman-Cuevas Tulare, CA USA December 27, 2016

Cabbage latkes Wow latkes made of cabbage sounds great. Reply

Susan Levitsky December 26, 2016

A vegetable not usually mentioned My sister makes latkes from shredded cabbage, the kind in the bags at the supermarket. If you have a choice, the angel hair shredding is better. Much to my surprise, they taste really good and with a little apple sauce they don't really taste different because the look and texture are right. Most of the hard work has been done so they are quick to make. For those watching their carbs, cabbage is a good substitute. Reply

Miriam Szokovski December 26, 2016

ingredients Hi Ian,

The amounts are there in the recipe after all the pictures. Reply

Miriam Szokovski December 26, 2016

salt Hi Rochel,

Did you use kosher salt or table salt? Table salt is saltier, so you would need about half the amount. Could that be it? Reply

Rochel Rechovot Israel December 24, 2016

I followed the recipe exactly. The texture was amazing but it came out way too salty.
Why would that happen? Can it be because the salt in Israel is different?
Love the step by step pictures and directions btw :) Reply

Ian Calgary December 24, 2016

More detail needed Looks delicious but how many potatoes and how much flour? Did I miss it? Reply

Anonymous SC December 17, 2016

Condiment of choice with latkes As children my mother made latkes and we always enjoyed them with applesauce. We loved eating them that way! Reply

joan licciarello west deptford December 9, 2016

I love latkes, I was raised on these when growing up, and a real go to when I get hungry, but my favorite condiment has to be spicey mustard Reply

Miriam Szokovski December 8, 2016

gluten free correct. this is recipe is not gluten free.

here are two that are:

chabad.org/3510571

chabad.org/2396385 Reply

Anonymous December 7, 2016

Gluten free means no flour in this recipe... No matzah meal either. Reply

Anonymous December 24, 2014

home made applesauce I like to make different apple sauces from various types of apples. Granny Smith apple sauce is my favorite. It is fun to try the various apples for sauce. Reply

Amy Cuevas Guzman Tulare, CA December 23, 2014

I did make some latkes in the oven, it was a disastrous good thing that I did make some in the old fashion way, No body like the ones from the oven. Reply

Isa Makaveiu December 21, 2014

Todah rabah! Great tip with the carrot! I initially thought it's about taste. My Jewish ancestors come from Romania, we always add a bit of garlic either into the oil or the food itself.
Chag Sameach Chanukah! Reply

Susan Levitsky December 17, 2014

Baked latkes are just as good I always bake my latkes on two large oiled cookie sheets at 400 degrees. I can make 24 good sized latkes at a time with very little watching on my part. After about 15 minutes, I turn them over. If they are stuck, it means they need to be baked a little more before turning. I also switch the sheets between the two shelves.
I definitely recommend using a food processor. (I use a Salad Shooter.) You can grate a lot of potatoes in a very short time before they have a chance to turn brown. I never drain the potatoes but add some potato starch. There is usually very little liquid in the bottom of the bowl and I just spoon it up with the potatoes when making the latkes.
I had some tonight and they were delicious, especially with apple sauce. Nothing like eating latkes with the Chanukah candles burning nearby. Reply

Anshel December 17, 2014

When I see "traditional" I right away think of where the tradition comes from. And in case of Latkes it is from Ukraine or Russia. One would never see potato grated with large hole grater. Only small one, similar to a zester grater. Those, those are the traditional latkes, these ones not so much. Reply

Amy Cuevas Tulare, CA. December 16, 2014

Potatoes Latkes One of my relatives whom his parents are Mexican tried for the first time potato latkes has add tabasco sauce instead of apple sauce or sour cream, he said he likes it better with the hot sauce. Reply

Cook It Kosher features recipes from Chabad.org food blogger Miriam Szokovski, as well as guest bloggers and cookbook authors. Let us know if you’d like to contribute!
Miriam SzokovskiMiriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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