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Beet Latkes Stuffed with Goat Cheese

Beet Latkes Stuffed with Goat Cheese

A decadent Chanukah treat

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Oh, latkes...glorious latkes...

Yes, it's that time of year again, and I can't wait for you to try this fabulous new recipe I've come up with: Beet latkes stuffed with goat cheese!


Why latkes? After winning the war against the Syrians, the Maccabees returned to Jerusalem to liberate it. They entered the Temple and cleared it of the idols placed there by the Syrian vandals. Since the Temple's golden Menorah had been stolen by the Syrians, the Maccabees now made one of cheaper metal. When they wanted to light it, they found only a small cruse of pure olive oil bearing the seal of the High Priest Yochanan. It was sufficient to light the Menorah only for one day, but by a miracle of G‑d, it continued to burn for eight days, till new oil was made available, which is why we celebrate Chanukah for eight days. Because of the miracle of oil, it's traditional to eat fried foods such as latkes and sufganiyot (doughnuts).

Beets and goat cheese are a classic pairing, most typically found in salads, but I've given them a new spin in this latke recipe, and let me tell you—they are INCREDIBLE.

You'll want to freeze the goats cheese slightly so that it doesn't ooze out while frying, so that's our first step. Slice the goats cheese thinly and put it in the freezer.


Now, peel and shred the beets. You can use a food processor or a manual grater. Also shred the onion and mix it with the beets. NOTE: Some food processors get stuck when you try to grate onion, so feel free to dice the onion very finely instead. I've done it both ways. In the pictures you can see the pieces of onion because I diced them.


Mix the beets, onion, egg, flour and salt. Do not worry if the batter seems dry compared to a potato latke batter—that's the way it should be.

Now you're ready to fry and assemble the latkes. Adding a piece of carrot to the oil any time you’re frying helps absorb the burnt taste. When the carrot starts to look shriveled, remove it and put in a fresh piece. It works. Trust me. I take my frying carrots very seriously.

So Put a little oil in the frying pan and turn the fire up to medium-high (for example, if your dial gives options from 1-10, you'll want it on about 7). If the fire is too low your latkes will come out soft and a little mushy rather than nice and crisp.

Use a spoon, or a small measuring cup (1/8 cup) to scoop up the batter. Gently place a spoon of batter in the pan and flatten it.


Place a piece of goat cheese on top of the batter.


And now cover the goat cheese with another scoop of batter.


Fry for 3-4 minutes, then gently flip the latkes and fry for another 1-2 minutes on the second side. When ready, the latkes will be crisp on the outside and soft on the inside, with the goat cheese deliciously melted.

If you're looking for a non-dairy option, make these without the cheese. I fried some of the beet mixture plain and it was also a big success.

Latkes are always best served right out of the pan, but can also be refrigerated and reheated later. The best way to reheat is by doing a quick shallow fry with very little oil in the frying pan, or you can spread them out on a cookie sheet and reheat in the oven.

Then again, reheating assumes you have any left, which I have yet to experience with these decadent beauties.


Ingredients

  • 20 oz. shredded raw beets
  • ½ a large onion, shredded or finely diced
  • 2 eggs
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • goat cheese (I used a 7oz. tube)
  • oil for frying

Directions

  1. Finely slice the goat cheese into rounds and freeze for 15-20 minutes.
  2. Mix the shredded beets, onion, flour, eggs and salt.
  3. Pour 2-4 tbsp. of oil into the frying pan and heat on medium-high.
  4. Use a spoon, or a small measuring cup (1/8 cup) to scoop up the batter. Gently place a spoon of batter in the pan and flatten it.
  5. Place a piece of goat cheese on top of the batter, then cover the goat cheese with another scoop of batter.
  6. Fry for 3-4 minutes, then gently flip the latkes and fry for another 1-2 minutes on the second side. When ready, the latkes will be crisp on the outside and soft on the inside, with the goat cheese deliciously melted.
  7. Repeat until batter is finished.

Yields: 12 latkes.


Are you a potato traditionalist or you do you enjoy trying new latke combinations? What will you be cooking for Chanukah?


Miriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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Rochi NY April 25, 2017

A neighbor brought these over to our girls basement apartment, I'd never seen her before, but there she was apron on and delicious lakes for us on Chanukah! I was so touched and now years later am making these. They're delicious, a healthy latke option! They beg to be shared. To me these latkes represent kindness because of the caring heart of a neighbor. Reply

Devorah Michigan December 30, 2014

Fabulous! I made these on the last night of Chanukah and they were really wonderful. I would definitely make these again- even to go with fleishigs, the beet part by itself was great. The cheese stuffing pushed this latke over the top though!

Thanks so much Reply

Chavah Kwiatkowska Latvia December 14, 2014

I used to think I didn't like beets till I tried this wonderful recipe. Dear Miriam, thank you very much for it! Reply

olivia December 8, 2014

this was so yum! the goat cheese paired with the onion/beets made for a really amazing taste. will be making this again! Reply

adina ny December 7, 2014

looks amazing and healthy! Thank you! Reply

Anonymous Flagstaff, AZ December 7, 2014

Abraham In Australia Yes! LOL Reply

Anonymous Lewisville December 6, 2014

I love my Great-Grandmother's recipe, same as this but with Potatoes, from Germany Reply

Shirlee Australia December 5, 2014

Beet Latkes Stuffed with Goat Cheese You have to be joking.YUCK. They aren't latkes.
Latkes are grated potato, grated onion, a little salt, eggs and a small amount of potato flour to bind it if necessary. Reply

Scorpion Texas September 18, 2017
in response to Shirlee:

Lighten up - young lady. You don't have the corner on latkes. Reply

Abraham Australia December 4, 2014

Did anyone else read this as Beef and Goat's Cheese and say "that's not kosher!"

How blind of me! Reply

Anonymous sweden December 4, 2014

Miriam sounds delicious....I still have a dream of one time in the future sit down in your kitchen for a treat. blessings Reply

Anonymous December 3, 2014

You had me at goat cheese and beets! What a wonderful recipe! Reply

DJ Hill Denver December 2, 2014

this sounds great however, I don't like beets. On the other hand, I like goat's cheese, so I'll try it traditional (with a toping of peanut butter and maple syrup (YUM!)), I'll let you know. Reply

rishe crown hts November 30, 2014

Done. success. ok i made them.
they tasted WILDLY delicious.
this is a winner, Miriam! Reply

Cook It Kosher features recipes from Chabad.org food blogger Miriam Szokovski, as well as guest bloggers and cookbook authors. Let us know if you’d like to contribute!
Miriam SzokovskiMiriam Szokovski is the author of the historical novel Exiled Down Under, and a member of the Chabad.org editorial team. She shares her love of cooking, baking and food photography on Chabad.org’s food blog, Cook It Kosher.
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